Top Oro Valley, AZ Statutory Rape Lawyers Near You

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

570 N Columbus Blvd, Suite B, Tucson, AZ 85711

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

333 N. Wilmont Rd, Suite 180, Tucson, AZ 85711

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

115 West Washington Street, Tucson, AZ 85701

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

3938 E Grant Road, Suite 423, Tucson, AZ 85712

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

100 N Stone Ave, Suite 1005, Tucson, AZ 85701

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

136 West Simpson, Tucson, AZ 85701

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

37625 S Skyline Dr, Tucson, AZ 85739

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

4711 N 1st Ave, Tucson, AZ 85718-5610

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

PO Box 40158, Tucson, AZ 85717

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

1 South Church Avenue, Suite 1500, Tucson, AZ 85701

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

110 S Church, Suite 4297, Tucson, AZ 85701

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

2810 N. Swan Rd., Suite 160, Tucson, AZ 85712

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

55 West Franklin, Tucson, AZ 85701

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

2 E. Congress St., Suite 1000, Tucson, AZ 85701

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

3060 North Swan Road, Tucson, AZ 85712

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

314 S 6th Ave, Tucson, AZ 85701

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

55 W Franklin St, Tucson, AZ 85701

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

177 N Church Ave, Suite 200, Tucson, AZ 85701

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

2870 North Swan Road, Suite 160, Tucson, AZ 85712

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

5210 East Williams Circle, Suite 800, Tucson, AZ 85711

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

177 N. Church Ave., Suite 200, Tucson, AZ 85701

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

33 North Stone Ave, Suite 1800, Tucson, AZ 85701

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

110 S Church St, Suite 7185, Tucson, AZ 85701

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

531 South Convent Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85701

Statutory Rape Lawyers | Tucson Office | Serving Oro Valley, AZ

1905 E 4th St, Tucson, AZ 85719

Oro Valley Statutory Rape Information

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Lead Counsel independently verifies Statutory Rape attorneys in Oro Valley and checks their standing with Arizona bar associations.

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Find a Statutory Rape Attorney near Oro Valley

What Is Statutory Rape?

Statutory rape is sexual intercourse or sexual contact with someone who is below the age of consent (which varies from state to state). Someone below the age of consent cannot legally consent to a sexual relationship, even if they give verbal consent. It is not up to the underage individual whether or not to press statutory rape charges. The prosecutor can charge a defendant with statutory rape offenses without the alleged victim’s consent.

The penalties for statutory rape depend on the jurisdiction. Statutory rape can be charged as rape, sexual abuse of a minor, or other sexual offenses. Criminal penalties may depend on a number of aggravating and mitigating factors, including:

  • Age of the victim
  • Age difference between the parties involved
  • Type of sexual activity
  • Giving the victim alcohol or drugs

How Is Rape Different From Statutory Rape?

Rape is unlawful sexual intercourse. Rape can be committed through force, coercion, or when the victim cannot give consent. For example, someone who is passed out or drugged may not have the mental state to consent to sexual penetration. With statutory rape, the victim cannot give consent because the law does not consider them to be old enough to give legal consent.

With underage sexual intercourse, it does not matter what the underage person does or says. The underage individual may be encouraging or pursuing sex but they still cannot give legal consent. If the underage person says they will not tell anyone, the defendant can still be charged if law enforcement officers find out about the sexual relationship.

In some cases, parents or guardians may be okay with a sexual relationship between the defendant and their minor child. However, it does not matter if the parents give consent or the victim says that it is okay. If a teacher, counselor, or other friend’s parent finds out about the sexual relationship and reports it, the police can still make an arrest for rape or sexual assault.

What Is the Age of Consent?

The age of consent is 16 to 18, depending on the state. However, the defendant’s age may also be considered in statutory rape charges. There may need to be a sufficient age differential between the victim and the defendant, if the victim is above an age minimum. There may also be a minimum age of the defendant in order to prosecute someone for statutory rape. Contact an experienced criminal defense lawyer to understand the legal defense strategies in your case.

How Much Jail Time Can a Person Get for Statutory Rape?

In most cases, statutory rape or sexual assault of a minor is a felony offense. The felony penalties for a statutory rape conviction may include more than a year in prison. When the minor victim is under a certain age, the prison sentence can be much longer, including up to life imprisonment.

In addition to jail time and fines, statutory rape may be considered a “registerable offense.” After the defendant serves their sentence and is released from jail, they may have to register with local law enforcement agencies as a sex offender. Sex offenders have mandatory registration every year or whenever they move.

Sex offenders are put on a database that is public information and can be searched by the defendant’s name or search location. The sex offender registry may have identifying information, including:

  • Name
  • Photograph
  • Physical description
  • Address
  • Sex crime

Is It a Defense if Someone Lied About Their Age?

In some cases, it may be a defense if the defendant had an honest and reasonable belief that the victim was over the age of consent. However, simply claiming the victim lied about their age may not be enough. It can help the defendant’s case if there are factors supporting their claim, including:

  • Victim had a fake I.D. and claimed an older age
  • Victim was in a place where minors are not generally present, including a bar
  • There were other witnesses who were told and thought the victim was older

However, even if the defendant has substantial evidence of a reasonable belief of the age of consent, there may be a bar to this defense if the victim is under a certain age. If you have questions about this or other legal defenses, talk to a sex crimes defense attorney.

Can You Sue for Statutory Rape?

For criminal statutory rape laws, it is up to the prosecutor to bring criminal charges. The victim is not required to support criminal charges and the victim cannot drop criminal charges. Even if the victim comes to the defendant’s defense, the prosecutor can still pursue a felony conviction.

The victim of statutory rape may be able to file a civil complaint against the defendant for civil penalties. A civil cause of action may allow the victim to recover damages from the defendant, including monetary compensation.

Do You Need a Statutory Rape Lawyer?

There are severe penalties associated with a statutory rape charge, including harsh prison sentences and lifetime sex offender registration. A criminal defense attorney can provide an aggressive defense strategy to help you avoid criminal charges. Contact an experienced attorney for legal advice.

Top Questions to Ask When Hiring an Attorney

  • How many years have you been practicing law? How long have you practiced law in the local area?
  • How many cases similar to mine have you handled in the past?
  • What is the likely outcome for my case?

In legal practice, experience matters. An experienced attorney will likely have handled issues similar to yours many, many times. Therefore, after listening to your situation, the attorney should have a reasonable idea of the time line for a case like yours and the likely resolution.

How to Prepare for Your Initial Consultation

Prepare for your consultation by writing down notes of your understanding of the case, jot down questions and concerns for the attorney, and gather your documents. Remember that you are trying to get a sense of whether the attorney has your trust and can help you address your legal issues. Questions should include how the attorney intends to resolve your issue, how many years he/she has been practicing law and specifically practicing in your area, as well as how many cases similar to yours the attorney has handled. It can also be helpful to broach the subject of fees so that you understand the likely cost and structure of your representation by a specific attorney and/or legal team.

Does firm size matter?

For most consumer legal issues, the size of the practice is much less important than the experience, competence, and reputation of the attorney(s) handling your case. Among the most important factors when choosing an attorney are your comfort level with the attorney or practice and the attorney’s track record in bringing about quick, successful resolutions to cases similar to yours.

Common legal terms explained

Pro se – This Latin term refers to representing yourself in court instead of hiring professional legal counsel. Pro se representation can occur in either criminal or civil cases.

Statute – Refers to a law created by a legislative body. For example, the laws enacted by Congress are statutes.

Subject matter jurisdiction – Requirement that a particular court have authority to hear the claim based on the specific type of issue brought to the court. For example, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court only has subject matter jurisdiction over bankruptcy filings, therefore it does not have the authority to render binding judgment over other types of cases, such as divorce.

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