Criminal Statutes of Limitations: Time Limits for State Charges

The time limit for when prosecutors can file criminal charges is known as a criminal statute of limitations. Both state and federal law forbids prosecutors from charging someone with a crime beyond the specified amount of time.

Statutes of limitations can vary by jurisdictions and contain exceptions. Some states have several tiers of felonies and a different time set for each particular offense. Other states have no criminal statutes of limitations at all.

You can see all 50 state statutes of limitations in detail below.

Purpose of Criminal Statute of Limitations

In general, these statutes were enacted to ensure fair trials without the possibility of evidence deteriorating over time. If the statute of limitations for the offense runs out, there can be no prosecution, and the alleged criminal cannot face criminal charges.

Take Bill Cosby’s sexual assault allegations, for example. While many allegations surfaced concerning Cosby assaulting women, only one relatively recent incident resulted in charges. This is because the statute of limitations ran out on most of the cases. In Pennsylvania, where the incidents occurred, the statute of limitations for sexual assault and rape is 12 years. This means that, because the incidents happened more than 12 years in the past, prosecutors could not charge Cosby for those cases.

Changes in Statutes of Limitations

State and federal criminal statutes of limitations may change from time to time, so it is important to stay up to date with the laws in your state. Historically, offenses such as domestic violence and rape had strict statutory periods, preventing prosecution in a vast number of cases.

With societal shifts and technological advances, a number of states are moving toward allowing longer periods of time in which to prosecute these cases. Some jurisdictions have completely done away with statutes of limitations for sexual or domestic violence offenses.

DNA evidence has also had an impact on the length of statutes of limitations. Some states allow for longer periods of time for prosecution when DNA evidence positively identifies the suspect.

Tolling the Statute of Limitations

In some cases, a “tolling” of the statute of limitations may take place. This means that the statute of limitations is temporarily suspended, similar to pausing a timer. This generally occurs when a suspect goes into hiding.

Most often, state statutes of limitations require a suspect to remain within the state, visible and employed. These nuances give law enforcement time to conduct an investigation within the area. On the other hand, if a suspect is in hiding or living out of state or out of the country, their statutory time clock will restart when they return to the area.

No Statutes of Limitations for Some Crimes

Some crimes have no statutes of limitations. For example, murder typically has none. Sexual crimes against minors and violent crimes have none in many states. In some states, crimes that involve public funds have no statutes of limitations.

In other jurisdictions, states rely on a classification system for felonies and utilize that in administering the statutes of limitations laws. For instance, New York does not have a statute of limitations for first-degree murder, rape, Class A felonies, or some arson and kidnapping offenses. Beyond that, their statutes of limitations are complex and depend on the particular set of circumstances in each case.

In a few states, such as Kentucky, West Virginia, and North Carolina, there is no statute of limitations on felony charges. A few others, including South Carolina and Wyoming, have no statutes of limitations for criminal charges at all.

Statutes of Limitations by State

For a better idea of the statutes of limitations for certain offenses in your area, take a look at the specific statutes for your state below. A criminal defense lawyer can often help give you a better idea about whether a prosecutor can file charges against you if you are a suspect. Likewise, it can be helpful for victims of crimes to know the statutes of limitations to ensure they press charges within the appropriate time frame.

Alabama

Felonies: No statutes of limitations in the case of capital offenses, violent offenses, arson, forgery, counterfeiting, drug trafficking, and any crimes involving minors; five years for all other felony offenses

Misdemeanors: One year

Code section: Title 15, Chapter 3

When statute tolls: If an indictment is lost or destroyed and a new indictment is later issued, the time that elapsed between the two indictments does not count toward the statutory period

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Alaska

Felonies: No statute of limitations for murder, attempted murder, murder-related offenses, felony sexual abuse of a minor, sexual assault, kidnapping, and felonies committed against minors; 10 years for most other felonies

Misdemeanors: Five years

Code section: 12.10.010

When statute tolls: If a suspect goes into hiding to avoid prosecution, the statute of limitations may be extended by up to three years

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Arizona

Felonies: No statute of limitations for capital offenses like homicide, conspiracy to commit homicide, terrorism, violent sexual assault, certain abuses of public funding and records, or unlawful uses of biological or radioactive substances; seven years for Class 2 through Class 6 felonies

Misdemeanors: One year for misdemeanors; six months for petty offenses (any offense that would only warrant a fine)

Code section: 13-107

When statute tolls: The statutory clock does not run when the suspect is a fugitive from the law or when the identity of a criminal suspect is unknown

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Arkansas

Felonies: Arkansas has a detailed breakdown of different felonies and their associated statutes of limitations:

  • No statute of limitations for murder or for rape when a positive DNA match is established or the victim was a child, other sex crimes against children, capital murder, or murder in the first or second degree
  • 10 years for arson
  • Six years for Class A or Class Y felonies
  • Five years for felonies committed by public servants
  • Three years for Class B, C, D, or unclassified felonies
  • Three years for insurance fraud with an additional two years added to the period for any insurance fraud involving a vehicle
  • One year for other fraud or breach of fiduciary duty

Misdemeanors: One year

Code section: 5-1-109

When statute tolls: The statute of limitations may be extended by up to three years if the accused is continually absent from the state or there is pending prosecution for the same conduct within the state

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California

Felonies: No statute of limitations for murder, other capital offenses, embezzlement of public funds, or offenses punishable by life imprisonment; six years for felonies punishable by imprisonment for eight years or more; three years for other felonies punishable by imprisonment

Misdemeanors: One year for most misdemeanors; two years for sexual exploitation by medical professionals; three years for misdemeanors committed against minors under the age of 14

Code section: Penal Code Sections 799-805

When statute tolls: There is a maximum extension of three years if a suspect is not in California when the crime is committed or leaves the state after

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Colorado

Felonies: No statute of limitations for capital offenses including murder, attempted murder, kidnapping, treason, forgery, and sexual assault; either three or five years for vehicular homicide depending on the circumstance; three years for other felonies

Misdemeanors: 18 months

Code section: 16-5-401

When statute tolls: There is a maximum extension of five years if a suspect leaves the state or three years for certain offenses concealed by fraud

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Connecticut

Felonies: No statute of limitation for murder, most sexual offenses involving minors, forgery, treason, aggravated incest, or certain instances of sexual assault reported within 10 years with DNA evidence; 10 years for vehicular homicide and leaving the scene of an accident that resulted in death; five years for vehicular homicide or leaving the scene of an accident that resulted in death; three years for all other felonies

Misdemeanors: 18 months

Code section: 54-193

When statute tolls: The statute may be extended five years if the suspect is absent from the state and up to three years for certain offenses that are either difficult to detect or concealed by fraud

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Delaware

Felonies: No time limit for carrying out or attempting murder or any Class A felony or sexual offenses where the victim is a minor; five years for all other felonies unless DNA evidence is found within 10 years from the time of the crime

Misdemeanors: Three years for Class A misdemeanors; two years for Class B, C, or unclassified misdemeanors as well as other criminal violations

Special extensions: The Delaware criminal statute of limitation may be extended for:

  • Up to two years for offenses committed by a public officer or employee while in office
  • Up to three years for offenses including forgery, fraud, breach of fiduciary duty, misapplication of property, or concealed theft after the discovery of the crime or from the point someone should have reasonably been aware the crime occurred

Code section: Title 11 Section 205

When statute tolls: The clock does not run while the suspect flees the state, fails to receive proper notice of the charges from the prosecution, or during a period of time when the suspect is facing pending charges for the same criminal conduct

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District of Columbia

Felonies: No time limit for first or second-degree murder, murdering law enforcement or public employees, terrorism, sexual abuse, or incest; 10 years for other sexual crimes or trafficking, including those committed against a minor; three years for all other felonies

Misdemeanors: Three years

Code section: 23-113

When statute tolls: The clock does not run while the suspect is fleeing the District to avoid prosecution, has pending charges in the District for the same offense, or until the victim of a sexual crime as a minor turns 21 years old

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Florida

Felonies: No time limit for any capital offense that may result in the death penalty or life imprisonment; four years for first-degree felonies; three years for all other felonies

Misdemeanors: Two years for first-degree misdemeanors; one year for second-degree misdemeanors or violations

Special exception: Florida law allows the prosecution to bring criminal charges at any time after the identity of the alleged criminal is established by DNA evidence or should have been established for a number of crimes

Code section: 775.15

When statute tolls: There is a maximum extension of three years if a suspect leaves the state to avoid prosecution; crimes involving video voyeurism may be extended up to one year

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Georgia

Felonies: No time limit for murder; 15 years for forcible rape; seven years for crimes punishable by death or life imprisonment or for crimes committed against victims under 18 years old; four years for other felonies

Misdemeanors: Two years

Special Exception: Armed robbery, kidnapping, rape, and certain aggravated sexual offenses can be brought at any time when DNA evidence is used to establish the identity of the alleged offender

Code section: 17-3-1

When statute tolls: The clock does not run while the suspect resides outside the state or during the period when the crime is unknown

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Hawaii

Felonies: No statute of limitations for first- or second-degree murder or attempted murder and first- or second-degree sexual assault; 10 years for manslaughter (non-vehicular); six years for Class A felonies; five years for offenses against property rights; three years for other felonies

Misdemeanors: Two years for general misdemeanors or parking violations; one year for petty misdemeanors or other violations

Special extensions: The statutory period may be extended by up to six years upon discovery for offenses of fraud or breach of fiduciary duty, three years upon discovery of offenses committed by public officials, or 10 years for felony offenses involving DNA evidence of the alleged offender

Code section: 701-108

When statute tolls: There is a maximum extension of four years when a suspect leaves the state, is pending prosecution in the state for the same conduct, or where the victim of the crime is alive and under 18 years old

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Idaho

Felonies: No time limit for murder, voluntary manslaughter, rape, sexual crimes involving a child, or terrorism; five years for other felonies with the exception of three years for ritualized abuse or female genital mutilation of a child

Misdemeanors: One year for general misdemeanors; two years for refiling previously dismissed demeanors; four years for failure to report child abuse, abandonment, or neglect; five years for misuse of public funds

Code section: Title 19 Chapter 4

When statute tolls: The clock does not run while the suspect is not an inhabitant or resident of the state

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Illinois

Felonies: No time limit for first- and second-degree murder, attempt or solicitation to commit murder, involuntary manslaughter, reckless homicide, treason, forgery, arson, child pornography, or major sexual offenses; seven years for identity theft, theft exceeding $100,000 of value, or financial exploitation of a person who is elderly or has a disability; three years for all other unspecified felonies

Misdemeanors: 18 months

Code section: 720 ILCS 5/Article 3

When statute tolls: Illinois law allows for the statutory period to toll in instances where:

  • The alleged offender is not a resident or not usually located within the state
  • The alleged offender is pending, currently involved in, or appealing prosecution for the same criminal offense
  • A material witness to the crime is in the military and on active duty orders or on leave
  • The alleged offender is a public officer who is being charged with misuse of public funds while holding public office

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Indiana

Felonies: No time limit for murder or for Class A felonies; sex crimes committed against minors must be brought before the victim is 31 years oldfive years for most felonies with an extension of one year of sufficient DNA evidence

Misdemeanors: Two years

Code section: 35-41-4-2

When statute tolls: The clock does not run while the suspect resides outside the state, conceals themselves to avoid prosecution, conceals evidence, or holds public office if they are charged with bribery or theft of public funds

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Iowa

Felonies: No time limit for murder; 15 years for most sexual crimes involving minors, 10 years for most sexual crimes for adults or within three years after the offender is identified by DNA evidence; 10 years for kidnapping or human trafficking; three years for other aggravated felonies

Misdemeanors: Three years for serious misdemeanors; one year for simple misdemeanors

Code section: Title XVI Chapter 802

When statute tolls: The clock does not run while the suspect resides outside the state or holds public office if they are charged with a crime in connection to their duties but may only be extended up to five years for offenses involving fraud or bribery

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Kansas

Felonies: No time limit for murder, rape, aggravated sodomy, or terrorism; 10 years for victims in the state public employee retirement system; either 10 years or within one year of DNA evidence establishing the identity of the offender (whichever occurs later) for most sexually violent crimes; five years for other unspecified felony offenses

Misdemeanors: Five years

Code section: 21-5107

When statute tolls: The clock does not run while the suspect is hidden or out of state, the crime is concealed, or the suspect is facing pending prosecution for the same type of crime

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Kentucky

Felonies: No statutes of limitations

Misdemeanors: One year

Code section: Penal Code 500.050

Statute tolls: If a minor is a victim of a misdemeanor, the prosecution may pursue charges for up to five years after the victim turns 18 years old

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Louisiana

Felonies: No statute of limitations for murder, rape, or any crime punishable by death or life imprisonment; 30 years for other serious sexual offense and if the victim was a minor (this time period starts when the victim turns 18 years old); six years for offenses punishable by imprisonment at hard labor; four years for other offenses

Misdemeanors: Two years for offenses punishable by a fine, prison time, or both; six months for offenses punishable by fine or forfeiture

Code section: Code of Criminal Procedure 571 through 583

When statute tolls: The clock does not run for instances such as:

  • When the suspect is hiding, out of state, or flees the state to avoid prosecution
  • When the suspect lacks the mental capacity to stand trial
  • When the suspect fails to appear in court after being properly notified and the legal proceedings have already begun
  • Until the crime is discovered by the victim for video voyeurism offenses
  • Until a crime against the Firefighter’s Retirement System is discovered by the FRS

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Maine

Felonies: No time limit for murder, first- or second-degree homicide, incest, rape, gross sexual assault, unlawful sexual contact, or sexual abuse of a minor; 20 years for Class A, B, or C felonies involving unlawful sexual contact or assault; six years for other Class A, B, or C offenses

Misdemeanors: Three years for Class D or E offenses

Code section: Criminal Code Title 17-A Section 8

When statute tolls: The statute does not run for up to five years when the suspect leaves the state; any time there is prosecution pending against the suspect for the same conduct in the state, including in Juvenile Court; or up to six months if the charges were dropped due to an error to allow the prosecution time to refile charges

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Maryland

Felonies: Generally there is no time limit for felony offenses unless otherwise specified by statute

Misdemeanors: No time limit for misdemeanors punishable by prison (as opposed to jail) time; three years for welfare offenses; one year for other misdemeanors

Code section: 5-106 et seq.

When statute tolls: None

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Massachusetts

Felonies: No time limit for murder or sexual offenses involving minors (but charges filed after 27 years have specific evidentiary requirements); 15 years for rape and sexual assault crimes against children; 10 years for robbery or intent to rob/murder with a deadly weapon; six years for other felonies

Misdemeanors: Six years

Code section: M.G.L. Chapter 277 Section 63

When statute tolls: The clock does not run while the suspect resides outside the state; for sex crimes involving children, the clock does not run until the child turns 16 or the crime is first reported, whichever occurs first

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Michigan

Felonies: No time limit for murder, conspiracy or solicitation to commit murder, first-degree sexual offenses, or other offenses punishable by life imprisonment; 25 years for human trafficking offenses covered under Theresa Flores’s Law; 15 years or by the victim’s 28th birthday for second- or third-degree sexual offenses against minors; 10 years for kidnapping, extortion, assault with intent to commit murder, attempted murder, manslaughter, armed robbery, or first-degree home invasion; six years for other felonies

Misdemeanors: Six years

Code section: Section 767.24

When statute tolls: The clock does not run while the suspect resides outside the state

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Minnesota

Felonies: No time limit for murder, manslaughter, kidnapping, or trafficking minors with DNA evidence; nine years for criminal sexual misconduct or trafficking minors without DNA evidence; six years for trafficking adults, bribery, theft, or medical assistance fraud; five years for arson or environmental offenses; three years for other felonies

Misdemeanors: Three years

Code section: Sec. 628.26

When statute tolls: The suspect resides outside the state or participates in a pre-trial diversion plan

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Mississippi

Felonies: No time limit for murder, manslaughter, rape, aggravated assault, kidnapping, arson, domestic violence, burglary, forgery, robbery, counterfeiting, embezzlement, financial fraud, human trafficking, abuse, or sex crimes against children; six years for larceny of timber; five years for conspiracy; two years for other felonies

Misdemeanors: Two years

Code section: 99-1-5

When statute tolls: While the suspect resides outside the state

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Missouri

Felonies: No time limit for murder, first-degree rape, sodomy, or Class A offenses; 10 years for sexual offenses involving minors under 17 years old; five years for most arson-related felonies; three years for other felony offenses

Misdemeanors: One year for misdemeanors; six months for infractions

Code Section: Section 556.036

When statute tolls:

  • Up to three years when the suspect is absent from the state
  • Any time when the suspect conceals themself to avoid prosecution
  • Any time there is existing prosecution against the suspect for the same offense within the state
  • Any time the suspect is found mentally unfit
  • Any time after DNA evidence identifies a match to the suspect

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Montana

Felonies: No time limit for deliberate or negligent homicide; 10 years from the 18th birthday of the victim of sexual crimes against a minor; five years for other felony offenses

Misdemeanors: One year for most misdemeanors; three years for crimes related to wildlife and outdoor activity or reckless driving

Special extensions: An additional one year is added for offenses against minors and mentally incompetent adults involving a breach of fiduciary duty or certain computer crimes

Code section: 45-1-205

When statute tolls: While the suspect resides outside the state

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Nebraska

Felonies: No time limit for treason, murder, arson, forgery, first- or second-degree sexual assault, third-degree sexual assault of a child, incest, creating or selling child pornography, or trafficking of a minor; seven years or by the victim’s 16th birthday for possession of child pornography, kidnapping, child abuse, or pandering; three years for most other felonies

Misdemeanors: 18 months

Code section: 29-110

When statute tolls: If the suspect is fleeing from justice, the statutory period may be extended indefinitely

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Nevada

Felonies: No time limit for murder, sexual assault arising out of the same facts as terrorism or murder, sexual assault with DNA evidence identifying the suspect, or sexual assault or trafficking if a written report was filed with law enforcement during the statute of limitation; four years for most other felonies unless specified otherwise by statute

Misdemeanors: Two years for gross misdemeanors; one year for lesser offenses

Code section: 171.080 through 171.100

When statute tolls: In cases of child sexual abuse or trafficking, the victim has until their 36th birthday to discover or reasonably should have discovered the crime or until their 43rd birthday if they could not reasonably discover the crime

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New Hampshire

Felonies: No time limit for murder, assisting or concealing murder, or hindering a murder investigation; 20 years for sexual offenses or within 22 years of the victim’s 18th birthday if the victim was a minor; six years for Class A and B offenses or unemployment compensation crimes; three years for hunting or off-roading offenses;

  • Within one year after its discovery by an aggrieved party or by a person who has a duty to represent such person and is not a party to the offense for a theft where property was misappropriated or for any offense where a material element is either fraud or a breach of fiduciary duty.
  • At any time when the defendant is in public office or within two years thereafter for any offense based upon misconduct in office by a public servant

Misdemeanors: One year for misdemeanors; six months for violations involving motor vehicle accidents resulting in death or serious injury; three months for violations

Code section: Criminal Code Section 625:8

When statute tolls: The clock does not run when the suspect is absent from the state, already facing prosecution for the same conduct, or anytime the suspect is in public office or within two years thereafter

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New Jersey

Indictable offenses (felonies): No time limit for murder, manslaughter, or sexual assault; seven years for bribery, official misconduct, or any attempt or conspiracy to commit these offenses; five years from the victim’s 18th birthday or two years after the discovery of other indictable offenses when a minor is a victim, whichever is later; five years for other unspecified offenses

Disorderly person offenses (misdemeanors): One year for general or petty offenses

Code section: 2C: 1-6

When statute tolls: If the suspect is fleeing from justice or facing prosecution for the same conduct, the statutory period may be extended indefinitely

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New Mexico

Felonies: No time limit for capital or first-degree felonies; six years for second-degree felonies; five years for third- and fourth-degree felonies such as larceny; five years for tax-related offenses starting from December 31st of the year the crime occurred; three years for other felonies, including unemployment fraud

Misdemeanors: Two years for misdemeanors; one year for petty misdemeanors

Code section: 30-1-8 through 30-1-9.2

When statute tolls: The clock does not run while the suspect resides outside the state or until a suspect is positively identified when DNA evidence exists but not yet matched with a suspect

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New York

Felonies: No time limit for Class A offenses, murder, first-degree rape, sexual misconduct against a child, and aggravated sexual abuse; 20 years after the crime or within 10 years from reporting for second-degree rape; one year from discovery or when discovery should have occurred for larceny violating a fiduciary duty; five years for other unspecified felonies

Misdemeanors: Two years for general offenses; one year for petty offenses;

Code section: Section 30.10

When statute tolls: If a suspect goes into hiding, the statute may extend up to three years; criminal charges relating to official misconduct may be brought at any time while the suspect is holding office or five years thereafter

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North Carolina

Felonies: None

Misdemeanors: No time limit for malicious offenses committed with willful malice; two years for other offenses

Code section: G.S. § 15-1

When statute tolls: Not applicable

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North Dakota

Felonies: No time limit for murder; 10 years or within three years of reporting with DNA evidence identifying the suspect for sexual crimes against children; three years for other unspecified offenses

Misdemeanors: Two years

Code section: 29-04

When statute tolls: The clock does not run while the suspect resides outside the state

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Ohio

Felonies: No time limit for murder; 20 years for high-level felonies such as rape, sexual crimes against minors, kidnapping, arson, robbery, or attempting or conspiring to commit any of these crimes; six years for other unspecified non-capital offenses; two years for misconduct in public office

Misdemeanors: Two years for general misdemeanors; six months for petty misdemeanors

Code section: 2901.13

When statute tolls: If the suspect is fleeing from justice or facing prosecution for the same conduct, the statutory period may be extended indefinitely

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Oklahoma

Felonies: No time limit for murder; seven years for rape, sexual offenses against children, bribery, falsifying public records, or misappropriation of public assets, but statutes may be extended three years with DNA evidence identifying the suspect; five years for conspiracy, embezzlement, or state tax offenses; three years for unspecified offenses

Misdemeanors: Three years

Code section: 22-151 through 22-153

When statute tolls: The clock does not run while the suspect resides outside the state or absent from the state

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Oregon

Felonies: No time limit for murder or manslaughter; 12 years for first-degree sexual offenses or crimes against minors by the victim’s 30th birthdaysix years for second-degree sexual offenses or crimes against minors by the victim’s 30th birthday;; four years for identity theft, fraud, arson, or third-degree sexual offenses and crimes against minors by the victim’s 22nd birthdaythree years for other unspecified offenses

Misdemeanors: Two years for misdemeanors; six months for violations

Code section: 131.105

When statute tolls: The clock does not run when the suspect is absent from the state, hides within the state, or not a resident of the state for up to three years

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Pennsylvania

Felonies: No time limit for murder offenses, felonies connected with a murder, voluntary manslaughter, vehicular homicide, or aggravated assault when the suspect knows the victim is law enforcement; 12 years for rape, incest, or sexual abuse of children; eight years for offenses committed by public employees or anytime during their employment; five years for aggravated assault, arson, kidnapping, burglary, prostitution, intimidating a witness or victim, perjury, terrorist threats, forgery, or insurance fraud; two years for unspecified felonies

Misdemeanors: Two years

Code section: 42 § 5551 through 5554

When statute tolls: If the suspect is fleeing from justice or facing prosecution for the same conduct, the statutory period may be extended indefinitely; when a minor is a victim of a sex crime, the clock does not begin to run until the victim turns 18

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Rhode Island

Felonies: No time limit for serious offenses such as murder, rape, sexual assault, child molestation, bigamy, arson, counterfeiting, conspiracy, burglary, forgery, or the manufacturing, distributing, or possession of controlled substances; 10 years for larceny, bribery, racketeering, extortion, antitrust violations, or any attempt or conspiracy to commit any of these offenses; three years for other unspecified felonies

Misdemeanors: Three years

Code section: Gen. Laws § 12-12-17

When statute tolls: If an indictment has been stolen or destroyed, a new indictment may be filed within one year regardless of the elapsed time

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South Carolina

Felonies and Misdemeanors: No statutes of limitations.

Code Section: The South Carolina Code of Laws does not include criminal statutes of limitations

When statute tolls: Not applicable

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South Dakota

Felonies: No time limits for Class A, Class B, or Class C felonies including murder; seven years for all other felonies

Misdemeanors: Seven years

Code section: Chapter 23A-42

When statute tolls: The clock does not run while the suspect is absent from the state

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Tennessee

Felonies: No time limit for murder or crimes punishable by death or life imprisonment; 15 years for Class A offenses; eight years for Class B offenses or arson; six years for defrauding the state, evading or failing to pay taxes, or fraudulent tax returns; four years for Class C or D offenses; two years for Class E offenses; three years for other unspecified offenses

Misdemeanors: One year for general misdemeanors; six months for offenses relating to gaming

Code section: 40-2-101

When statute tolls: The clock does not run while the suspect resides outside the state or while the crime is being concealed; in certain offenses where the victim is a child, the statute begins running when the child turns 18 years old

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Texas

Felonies: No time limit for murder, manslaughter, compelling child prostitution, or hit-and-run accidents resulting in death; no time limit or 10 years for major sexual crimes or human trafficking depending on statutory requirements; 10 years for forgery, arson, injuries to a elderly or disabled person, or theft by a public official or involving a fiduciary duty; seven years for certain tax crimes, fraud, identity theft, credit or debit card abuse, bigamy, exploiting a child or elderly person, or using a document to execute a document; five years for other theft offenses, insurance fraud, or abandoning or endangering a child; three years for unspecified offenses

Misdemeanors: Two years

Code section: Code of Criminal Procedure 12.01

When statute tolls: The clock does not run while the suspect is not in the state or pending charges for the same conduct in the state; the day of the crime and the day of the indictment do not count toward the statute of limitation; if the victim is under 18 years old, the time period may be extended from 10 to 20 years, depending on the offense

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Utah

Felonies: No time limit for murder, manslaughter, major sex crimes, and sex crimes against children; four years for other felony or negligent homicide actions; three years for official misconduct, fraud, or breach of fiduciary duty; two years for misuse of public funds or bribery

Special Exception: If DNA evidence is used to positively identify the suspect, the statute of limitations may be changed by statute

Misdemeanors: Two years for misdemeanors; one year for infractions

Code section: Part 76-1-3

When statute tolls: The clock does not run while the suspect resides outside the state

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Vermont

Felonies: No time limit for aggravated sexual assault, sexual assault, sexual exploitation of a minor, human trafficking, aggravated human trafficking, murder, manslaughter, arson causing death, or kidnapping; 40 years for other sex crimes involving a minor; 11 years for aggravated domestic assault or arson; six years for grand larceny, bribery, forgery, specific fraud or tax offenses, lewd and lascivious conduct, or sexual abuse of a vulnerable adult; three years for other unspecified offenses

Misdemeanors: Three years

Code section: 13 V.S.A. § 4501

When statute tolls: Not specified in the Vermont law

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Virginia

Felonies: No time limit for murder, rape, sodomy, sexual penetration with an object, aggravated or infected sexual battery, or any attempt of these offenses; five years for unlawful creation of the image of another or animal cruelty (excluding agricultural animals)

Misdemeanors: One year for most misdemeanors; two years for attempt to produce an abortion, malfeasance in office or building code violations, or unauthorized practice of law; three years for false presentation of Virginia employment benefits, evading or failing to pay taxes, unlawful sales of freshwater fish or wild animals, real estate board violations, or certain toxic substance offenses; five years for petit larceny

Code section: § 19.2-8 through § 19.2-9

When statute tolls: The clock does not run during the period that a suspect is fleeing state justice or concealing themself in the state to avoid prosecution

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Washington

Felonies: No time limit for murder, homicide, and rape or molestation of a minor under 16; 20 years for indecent liberties or first- or second-degree rape; 10 years for attempted murder, human trafficking, third-degree rape, incest, public official misconduct relating to duties, or arson; six years for money laundering, bigamy, identity crimes, theft, or other Class C felonies; three years for other unspecified offenses

Special extensions: If the victim is under 18 years old at the time of the crime, the statute may be extended up to the victim’s 30th birthday if later than the time period allotted by the statute

Misdemeanors: Two years for gross misdemeanors; one year for other misdemeanors

Code section: 9A.04.080

When statute tolls: The clock does not run while the suspect resides outside the state or not usually in the state

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West Virginia

Felonies: There is no time limit for felonies in West Virginia

Misdemeanors: Three years for perjury charges; one year for all other misdemeanors

Code section: § 61-11-9

When statute tolls: If an indictment is stolen, lost, or destroyed, a new indictment may be issued and any time that elapsed between the loss of the first indictment and the processing of the second indictment is not counted as part of the statutory period

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Wisconsin

Felonies: No time limit for murder, attempted or committed first-degree homicide, second-degree intentional homicide, or attempted or committed first-degree sexual assault; until the victim turns 45 years old for certain sexual crimes against children; 15 years for second-degree reckless homicide; up to 11 years for criminal misappropriation after the discovery of the loss; 10 years for second or third-degree sexual assault; six years for other offenses

Special extensions: Certain crimes may be extended up to one year if DNA evidence positively identifies the suspect

Misdemeanors: Three years

Code section: 939.74

When statute tolls: The clock does not run while the suspect remains hidden or resides outside the state; the statutory period may be extended “due to the effects of the sexual contact or due to any threats, instructions, or statements from the therapist”

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Wyoming

Felonies: No statute of limitations

Misdemeanors: No statute of limitations

Code section: Wyoming law does not address criminal statutes of limitations

When statute tolls: Not applicable

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