Top Philadelphia, PA Juvenile Law Lawyers Near You

Juvenile Law Lawyers | West Chester Office | Serving Philadelphia, PA

25 S. Church Street, West Chester, PA 19382

Juvenile Law Lawyers | Philadelphia Office

2001 Market St, Two Commerce Square, Suite 2620, Philadelphia, PA 19103

Juvenile Law Lawyers | Philadelphia Office

1500 JFK Blvd., 2 Penn Center Suite 1240, Philadelphia, PA 19102

Juvenile Law Lawyers | Philadelphia Office

One Logan Square, Suite 2000, Philadelphia, PA 19103-6996

Juvenile Law Lawyers | Philadelphia Office

Three Parkway, 1601 Cherry Street, Suite 1350, Philadelphia, PA 19102

Juvenile Law Lawyers | Philadelphia Office

Centre Square West, 1500 Market St, Suite 3400, Philadelphia, PA 19102

Juvenile Law Lawyers | Philadelphia Office

1901 Callowhill St, Philadelphia, PA 19130

Juvenile Law Lawyers | Norristown Office | Serving Philadelphia, PA

516 DeKalb Street, Norristown, PA 19401

Juvenile Law Lawyers | Southampton Office | Serving Philadelphia, PA

737 Second Street Pike, Southampton, PA 18966

Juvenile Law Lawyers | Philadelphia Office

100 S Broad St, Suite 1910, Philadelphia, PA 19110

Juvenile Law Lawyers | Philadelphia Office

1315 Walnut Street, 12th Floor, Philadelphia, PA 19107

Juvenile Law Lawyers | Philadelphia Office

100 South Broad Street, Suite 1910, Philadelphia, PA 19110

Juvenile Law Lawyers | Norristown Office | Serving Philadelphia, PA

1 E Airy St, Norristown, PA 19401

Juvenile Law Lawyers | Plymouth Meeting Office | Serving Philadelphia, PA

600 West Germantown Pike, Suite 400, Plymouth Meeting, PA 19462

Juvenile Law Lawyers | Pottstown Office | Serving Philadelphia, PA

933 N. Charlotte St, Ste 3-B, Pottstown, PA 19464

Juvenile Law Lawyers | Philadelphia Office

1601 Market Street, Suite 2230, Philadelphia, PA 19103

Juvenile Law Lawyers | Philadelphia Office

1500 Walnut St, Suite 1510, Philadelphia, PA 19102

Juvenile Law Lawyers | Philadelphia Office

1801 Market St, Suite 2300, Philadelphia, PA 19103

Philadelphia Juvenile Law Information

Lead Counsel Badge

Lead Counsel Verified Attorneys In Philadelphia

Lead Counsel independently verifies Juvenile Law attorneys in Philadelphia and checks their standing with Pennsylvania bar associations.

Our Verification Process and Criteria
  • Ample Experience Attorneys must meet stringent qualifications and prove they practice in the area of law they’re verified in.
  • Good Standing Be in good standing with their bar associations and maintain a clean disciplinary record.
  • Annual Review Submit to an annual review to retain their Lead Counsel Verified status.
  • Client Commitment Pledge to follow the highest quality client service and ethical standards.

Find a Juvenile Law Attorney near Philadelphia

Dealing With Juvenile Law Issues?

If your child is facing criminal charges, it is important to get the best legal representation possible because a criminal record will follow your child as each educational and employment opportunity becomes available. A juvenile attorney will be able to help your family seek a resolution that protects your child’s current best interests and their future prospects.

Who Qualifies As a Juvenile?

In terms of criminal law and the definitions surrounding juvenile offenses, most states and the federal government consider those who have not yet turned 18 years of age to be juveniles. Three states — Georgia, Texas and Wisconsin — instead restrict the protections afforded to juvenile offenders to those aged 16 or younger.

There is also a provision that allows those who are older than 18, but younger than 21, to claim legal juvenile status if they are being charged with an offense that was commissioned before the defendant attained the age of majority.

What Are Some Types of Juvenile Crime?

According to the Department of Justice, some of the most common offenses conducted by juvenile offenders include simple assault, disorderly conduct, drug-related crimes, weapons-related offenses, vandalism, liquor law violations and various forms of theft (burglary, automobile theft, etc.).

Juveniles are generally capable of committing any crime that an adult might. However, certain juvenile offenses (say, being in possession of alcohol) are offenses related strictly to the age of the individual in possession. Juvenile crime related to statutory rape (between two minors) can also be a form of offense that so-called “Romeo and Juliet” laws were enacted to combat.

Different Types of Juvenile Charges

Juveniles can be charged with any criminal offense; same as an adult, but their cases are usually handled in the Juvenile Courts. Some juvenile law charges include underage possession of alcohol, drug crimes, gang involvement, vandalism and juvenile DUI. Other juvenile law-related issues include disciplinary actions at school and foster care issues.

A juvenile lawyer can also provide direction for juveniles and their families to programs that will help the juvenile’s defense by minimizing the risk of the youth from re-offending and preventing future criminal behavior issues.

What Are the Possible Penalties for Juvenile Offenses in Pennsylvania?

While juvenile offenders (or juvenile delinquents, if deemed so from a legal perspective) are afforded some protections (exempt from serving time in prison unless tried and convicted as an adult, for more serious offenses, where applicable) they do remain culpable for crimes committed.

A juvenile offender who is convicted could be facing court-order probation, mandatory counseling or therapy sessions, mandatory drug or alcohol rehabilitation, fines or monetary restitution, community service or even a term in detention (also termed “residence facilities”).

In situations where a juvenile is being tried as an adult, the sentencing is typically expected to match the severity of the crime. Despite the surprising frequency of this occurrence (generally for the most severe offenses, or for extreme incidences of repeat offenses), some such instances become high-profile cases with the attendant media exposure.

When Are Juveniles Tried As Adults?

In order to be tried as an adult, juvenile offenders must be meted out a waiver to adult court. Most states require that a juvenile offender be the age of 16 (though some states have no age limit appended to more serious charges, such as murder) in order for such a waiver to be handed down by the court.

Reasons for a juvenile being tried as an adult include, but are not limited to: the commission of a very grave or serious offense such as rape or murder, the offender having a lengthy juvenile record or a number of failed rehabilitation attempts having been made in the past.

It is estimated that approximately 250,000 juvenile offenders are tried as adults, per year, in the United States.

Can Juveniles Get Life Sentences or the Death Penalty?

As a result of several relatively recent Supreme Court decisions, juvenile offenders are not able to be sentenced to death, nor sentenced to life in prison without parole in response to any crime other than those related to homicide.

What Does a Juvenile Crime Lawyer Do?

A juvenile crime lawyer or criminal defense attorney is familiar with established case law, past precedent, and current statutes surrounding juvenile delinquency. These attorneys specialize in defending juvenile clients facing charges and can help defendants to navigate the juvenile justice system.

All juveniles facing court due to alleged offenses are entitled to an attorney, regardless of their ability — or the ability of their parents or guardians — to pay. It is extremely important to secure adequate legal representation if you are facing charges as a juvenile. If found guilty of the offenses levied against you, depending on the severity of the charges, you could be placed in detention or even tried as an adult, as exhibited above.

The creation of a criminal record as a result of having been tried, and convicted, as an adult can be extremely damaging to any young man or woman. Therefore, it’s important to work with a criminal defense lawyer.

Best Time to Seek Legal Help

No matter what your legal issue may be, it is always best to seek legal help early in the process. An attorney can help secure what is likely to be the best possible outcome for your situation and avoid both unnecessary complications or errors.

Tips on Approaching an Initial Attorney Consultation

  • Use the consultation as a means of gaining a better understanding of your legal situation.
  • Ask the attorney how many cases similar to yours he/she has handled. An attorney’s experience and knowledge can speak to their expertise (or lack of) in addressing your situation.
  • Your attorney should be able to articulate roughly how long a case like yours will take to resolve and what sort of procedures to expect.
  • Determine how comfortable you are working with the lawyer and/or law firm.

Types of legal fees:

Bill by the hour: Many attorneys bill by the hour. How much an attorney bills you per hour will vary based on a number of factors. For instance, an attorney’s hourly fee may fluctuate based on whether that hour is spent representing you in court or doing research on your case. Attorneys in one practice area may bill you more than attorneys in a different practice area.

Contingent fee: Some lawyers will accept payment via contingent fee. In this arrangement, the lawyer receives a percentage of the total monetary recovery if you win your lawsuit. In sum, the lawyer only gets paid if you win. Contingent fee agreements are limited to specific practice areas in civil law.

Flat fee: For “routine” legal work where the attorney generally knows the amount of time and resources necessary to complete the task, he/she may be willing to bill you a flat fee for services performed.

Common legal terms explained

Affidavit – A sworn written statement made under oath. An affidavit is meant to be a supporting document to the court assisting in the verification of certain facts. An affidavit may or may not require notarization.

Page Generated: 0.24837613105774 sec