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Top Virginia Beach, VA Child Support Lawyers Near You

Child Support Lawyers | Virginia Beach Office

4768 Euclid Road, Suite 103, Virginia Beach, VA 23462-3810

Child Support Lawyers | Virginia Beach Office

1604 Hilltop West Executive Center, Suite 300, Virginia Beach, VA 23451

Child Support Lawyers | Chesapeake Office | Serving Virginia Beach, VA

133 Mount Pleasant Road, Chesapeake, VA 23322

Child Support Lawyers | Virginia Beach Office

565 N Birdneck Rd, Virginia Beach, VA 23451

Child Support Lawyers | Virginia Beach Office

5041 Corporate Woods Dr, Suite G180, Virginia Beach, VA 23462

Child Support Lawyers | Norfolk Office | Serving Virginia Beach, VA

500 East Main Street, Suite 801, Norfolk, VA 23510

Child Support Lawyers | Chesapeake Office | Serving Virginia Beach, VA

119 Byron Street, Chesapeake, VA 23320

Child Support Lawyers | Williamsburg Office | Serving Virginia Beach, VA

5425 Discovery Park Blvd, Suite 200, Williamsburg, VA 23188

Child Support Lawyers | Norfolk Office | Serving Virginia Beach, VA

425 W 20th St, Suite 5, Norfolk, VA 23517

Child Support Lawyers | Norfolk Office | Serving Virginia Beach, VA

999 Waterside Drive, Suite 2525, Norfolk, VA 23510

Child Support Lawyers | Norfolk Office | Serving Virginia Beach, VA

500 E. Plume Street, Suite 220, Norfolk, VA 23510

Child Support Lawyers | Chesapeake Office | Serving Virginia Beach, VA

1108 Madison Plaza, Suite 203, Chesapeake, VA 23320

Child Support Lawyers | Virginia Beach Office

565 N Birdneck Rd, Virginia Beach, VA 23451

Child Support Lawyers | Chesapeake Office | Serving Virginia Beach, VA

501 Baylor Court, Suite 200, Chesapeake, VA 23320

Child Support Lawyers | Yorktown Office | Serving Virginia Beach, VA

501 Village Avenue, Suite 104, Yorktown, VA 23693

Child Support Lawyers | Chesapeake Office | Serving Virginia Beach, VA

220 Mt. Pleasant Road, Suite 102, Chesapeake, VA 23322

Child Support Lawyers | Chesapeake Office | Serving Virginia Beach, VA

505 Independence Parkway, Suite 220, Chesapeake, VA 23320

Child Support Lawyers | Chesapeake Office | Serving Virginia Beach, VA

565 Cedar Road, Suite 20, Chesapeake, VA 23322

Child Support Lawyers | Virginia Beach Office

2876 Guardian Ln, Suite 201, Virginia Beach, VA 23452

Child Support Lawyers | Chesapeake Office | Serving Virginia Beach, VA

1108 Madison Plaza, Suite 203, Chesapeake, VA 23320

Child Support Lawyers | Norfolk Office | Serving Virginia Beach, VA

5900 E Virginia Beach Blvd., Norfolk, VA 23502

Child Support Lawyers | Hampton Office | Serving Virginia Beach, VA

4410 E Claiborne Sq, Suite 334, Hampton, VA 23666

Virginia Beach Child Support Information

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Lead Counsel Verified Attorneys In Virginia Beach

Lead Counsel independently verifies Child Support attorneys in Virginia Beach and checks their standing with Virginia bar associations.

Our Verification Process and Criteria
  • Ample Experience Attorneys must meet stringent qualifications and prove they practice in the area of law they’re verified in.
  • Good Standing Be in good standing with their bar associations and maintain a clean disciplinary record.
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Find a Child Support Attorney near Virginia Beach

Visit our free Child Support Resource Center.

Will I Have To Pay Child Support in a Divorce?

In a divorce where the couple has children, they will have to decide how to divide the property and how to share time with the children. The child custody order can determine which parent will pay child support. In most cases, the parent with the most parenting time is usually the custodial parent. The other parent is the noncustodial parent. In general, the noncustodial parent pays child support to the custodial parent but it depends on the individual situation.

How Is Child Support Calculated in Virginia?

The amount of child support is usually based on Virginia child support guidelines. Child support guidelines are calculated based on several factors, including parents’ income, number of children, custody time, child care, health insurance, other child support obligations, and other expenses. Calculating child support also takes into account where the parents live and travel expenses for visitation time with the child.

Can a Lawyer Change Child Support Payments?

If a parent thinks they didn’t get enough money, they may want to increase child support payments to properly care for their child. The parent paying the money may want to reduce the child support order because they don’t think the other parent will use the money properly. If you want to modify an existing child support order, you need to show a “substantial change in circumstances.” Your child support lawyer can file a petition for a child support modification.

How Can My Lawyer Enforce Child Support?

If the supporting parent is not paying child support or only pays a portion of the support, you can enforce payment. Your family law attorney can advise you on how you can enforce child support through court orders or with help from the Virginia child support services. Enforcement can include putting a levy on their bank account or lien on their property, garnishing wages, or taking tax refund money.

Does Child Support Affect My Taxes?

Child support payments are not tax deductible for the parent paying the support and the payments received are not considered income for the custodial parent. However, if you owe past-due child support, a taxpayer’s refunds may be reduced to pay the back child support.

What Happens if I Fail To Pay Child Support?

If you are having trouble paying child support, you can go to the court to petition to modify the support obligation. In general, you will have to show a substantial change in circumstances to get a reduction. This could include loss of your job, disabling injury, getting sent to prison, or facing a medical emergency. If you fail to make child support payments, they will continue to build. Back child support does not go away and it is not erased. Even if you go through personal bankruptcy, it will not erase child support debt. You may also have your driver’s license suspended or lose public assistance if you fail to pay child support.

When Does Child Support End?

A parent’s obligation to pay child support ends when the child reaches the age of majority. However, some states extend the age of majority obligations if the child begins attending college or other qualifying school. The parent’s child support obligations also end if the child becomes emancipated through the courts, gets married, or enters active-duty military.

Does Child Support Affect My Taxes?

Child support payments are not tax deductible for the parent paying the support and the payments received are not considered income for the custodial parent. However, if you owe past-due child support, a taxpayer’s refunds may be reduced to pay the back child support.

Can I Deny Visitation if My Ex Doesn’t Pay Support?

Child support matters and visitation rights are separate. It may not seem fair but whether or not your ex pays child support doesn’t mean you can violate the child custody order. Similarly, if your ex doesn’t let you see your child, you still have to pay support. If you want to enforce a child custody agreement or enforce child support issues, you should go to family law court instead of taking matters into your own hands. Talk to a child support attorney or law firm for legal advice about your child support case and legal issues.

What does child support cover?

A judge will order child support payments to make sure all of your child’s needs are met when you and your ex are no longer together and spending money. These payments can help cover expenses for your child like school, health care, food, clothing, housing, and more.

How much is child support?

Each state calculates child support according to its formula. This formula will take into account your earnings, your ex’s earnings, and your child’s financial needs for things like school, health care, food, and other necessities. A child support lawyer will be able to better help you anticipate what you expect to either owe or receive in child support payments.

How does child support affect my taxes?

Because child support payments are solely for the child’s benefit, they do not affect tax filings. If you pay child support, you cannot deduct those payments from your income, and if you receive child support, those payments will not count toward your taxable income. If you are late on child support payments, your state may intercept your tax refund to help pay off those debts.

How can I change my child support payments?

If you feel you pay too much child support or receive too little, you must prove a “substantial” change in circumstances to change your child support obligations. This means major changes will need to happen to either your or your ex’s income or your child’s financial needs. Some changes that can bring about a modification of support could include a raise, losing a job, or a serious illness.

How an Attorney Can Help

An attorney can often resolve your particular legal issue faster and better than trying to do it alone. A lawyer can help you navigate the legal system, while avoiding costly mistakes or procedural errors. You should seek out an attorney whose practice focuses on the area of law most relevant to your issue.

What to Expect from an Initial Consultation

  • Seek to determine whether the attorney can represent you. There is no one-size-fits-all legal solution and it may turn out your needs are better served by an attorney in a different specialization.
  • It’s important to find a legal ally who is both competent in the law and someone you can trust to protect your interests.
  • Discuss how the practice’s billing works and discuss possible additional charges or fees that may arise during or after the resolution of your case.

An attorney consultation should provide you with enough information so that you can make an informed decision on whether to proceed with legal help.

Types of legal fees:

Bill by the hour: Many attorneys bill by the hour. How much an attorney bills you per hour will vary based on a number of factors. For instance, an attorney’s hourly fee may fluctuate based on whether that hour is spent representing you in court or doing research on your case. Attorneys in one practice area may bill you more than attorneys in a different practice area.

Contingent fee: Some lawyers will accept payment via contingent fee. In this arrangement, the lawyer receives a percentage of the total monetary recovery if you win your lawsuit. In sum, the lawyer only gets paid if you win. Contingent fee agreements are limited to specific practice areas in civil law.

Flat fee: For “routine” legal work where the attorney generally knows the amount of time and resources necessary to complete the task, he/she may be willing to bill you a flat fee for services performed.

Common legal terms explained

Plaintiff – a person or party who brings a lawsuit against another person(s) or party/parties in a court of law. Private persons or parties can only file suit in civil court.

Judgment – A decision of the court. Also known as a decree or order. Judgments handed down by the court are usually binding on the parties before the court.

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