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Top Elmore, AL Child Support Lawyers Near You

Child Support Lawyers | Montgomery Office | Serving Elmore, AL

8428 Crossland Loop, Montgomery, AL 36117

Child Support Lawyers | Montgomery Office | Serving Elmore, AL

5789 Carmichael Pkwy, Montgomery, AL 36117

Child Support Lawyers | Montgomery Office | Serving Elmore, AL

122 S Hull Street, Montgomery, AL 36104

Child Support Lawyers | Montgomery Office | Serving Elmore, AL

8650 Minnie Brown Road, Suite 225, Montgomery, AL 36117

Child Support Lawyers | Prattville Office | Serving Elmore, AL

200 South Memorial Dr., Prattville, AL 36067

Child Support Lawyers | Montgomery Office | Serving Elmore, AL

320 N Hull St, Montgomery, AL 36104

Child Support Lawyers | Montgomery Office | Serving Elmore, AL

250 Commerce Street, Suite 12, Montgomery, AL 36104

Child Support Lawyers | Montgomery Office | Serving Elmore, AL

445 Dexter Avenue, Suite 8040, Montgomery, AL 36104

Child Support Lawyers | Prattville Office | Serving Elmore, AL

145 W. Main St., Prattville, AL 36067

Child Support Lawyers | Montgomery Office | Serving Elmore, AL

7004 Brockport Ct, Suite One, Montgomery, AL 36117-8019

Child Support Lawyers | Prattville Office | Serving Elmore, AL

147 E. Main St., PO Box 681864, Prattville, AL 36068-1864

Child Support Lawyers | Montgomery Office | Serving Elmore, AL

444 South Perry Street, PO Box 347, Montgomery, AL 36101-0347

Child Support Lawyers | Prattville Office | Serving Elmore, AL

830 Peachtree St, Prattville, AL 36066

Child Support Lawyers | Montgomery Office | Serving Elmore, AL

445 Dexter Avenue, Suite 9075, Montgomery, AL 36104

Child Support Lawyers | Montgomery Office | Serving Elmore, AL

150 South Perry Street, Montgomery, AL 36102-2069

Child Support Lawyers | Montgomery Office | Serving Elmore, AL

250 Commerce St, Suite 203, Montgomery, AL 36104

Child Support Lawyers | Montgomery Office | Serving Elmore, AL

PO Box 20787, Montgomery, AL 36120

Child Support Lawyers | Montgomery Office | Serving Elmore, AL

505 South Perry St., PO Box 746, Montgomery, AL 36104

Child Support Lawyers | Montgomery Office | Serving Elmore, AL

445 Dexter Ave, Suite 4050, Montgomery, AL 36104

Child Support Lawyers | Montgomery Office | Serving Elmore, AL

614 S Hull St, Montgomery, AL 36104

Child Support Lawyers | Montgomery Office | Serving Elmore, AL

7011 Fulton Ct, Montgomery, AL 36117

Child Support Lawyers | Montgomery Office | Serving Elmore, AL

445 Dexter Avenue, Suite 2040, Montgomery, AL 36104

Child Support Lawyers | Montgomery Office | Serving Elmore, AL

122 S Hull St, Montgomery, AL 36104

Elmore Child Support Information

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Lead Counsel Verified Attorneys In Elmore

Lead Counsel independently verifies Child Support attorneys in Elmore and checks their standing with Alabama bar associations.

Our Verification Process and Criteria
  • Ample Experience Attorneys must meet stringent qualifications and prove they practice in the area of law they’re verified in.
  • Good Standing Be in good standing with their bar associations and maintain a clean disciplinary record.
  • Annual Review Submit to an annual review to retain their Lead Counsel Verified status.
  • Client Commitment Pledge to follow the highest quality client service and ethical standards.

Find a Child Support Attorney near Elmore

Visit our free Child Support Resource Center.

Will I Have To Pay Child Support in a Divorce?

In a divorce where the couple has children, they will have to decide how to divide the property and how to share time with the children. The child custody order can determine which parent will pay child support. In most cases, the parent with the most parenting time is usually the custodial parent. The other parent is the noncustodial parent. In general, the noncustodial parent pays child support to the custodial parent but it depends on the individual situation.

How Is Child Support Calculated in Alabama?

The amount of child support is usually based on Alabama child support guidelines. Child support guidelines are calculated based on several factors, including parents’ income, number of children, custody time, child care, health insurance, other child support obligations, and other expenses. Calculating child support also takes into account where the parents live and travel expenses for visitation time with the child.

Can a Lawyer Change Child Support Payments?

If a parent thinks they didn’t get enough money, they may want to increase child support payments to properly care for their child. The parent paying the money may want to reduce the child support order because they don’t think the other parent will use the money properly. If you want to modify an existing child support order, you need to show a “substantial change in circumstances.” Your child support lawyer can file a petition for a child support modification.

How Can My Lawyer Enforce Child Support?

If the supporting parent is not paying child support or only pays a portion of the support, you can enforce payment. Your family law attorney can advise you on how you can enforce child support through court orders or with help from the Alabama child support services. Enforcement can include putting a levy on their bank account or lien on their property, garnishing wages, or taking tax refund money.

Does Child Support Affect My Taxes?

Child support payments are not tax deductible for the parent paying the support and the payments received are not considered income for the custodial parent. However, if you owe past-due child support, a taxpayer’s refunds may be reduced to pay the back child support.

What Happens if I Fail To Pay Child Support?

If you are having trouble paying child support, you can go to the court to petition to modify the support obligation. In general, you will have to show a substantial change in circumstances to get a reduction. This could include loss of your job, disabling injury, getting sent to prison, or facing a medical emergency. If you fail to make child support payments, they will continue to build. Back child support does not go away and it is not erased. Even if you go through personal bankruptcy, it will not erase child support debt. You may also have your driver’s license suspended or lose public assistance if you fail to pay child support.

When Does Child Support End?

A parent’s obligation to pay child support ends when the child reaches the age of majority. However, some states extend the age of majority obligations if the child begins attending college or other qualifying school. The parent’s child support obligations also end if the child becomes emancipated through the courts, gets married, or enters active-duty military.

Does Child Support Affect My Taxes?

Child support payments are not tax deductible for the parent paying the support and the payments received are not considered income for the custodial parent. However, if you owe past-due child support, a taxpayer’s refunds may be reduced to pay the back child support.

Can I Deny Visitation if My Ex Doesn’t Pay Support?

Child support matters and visitation rights are separate. It may not seem fair but whether or not your ex pays child support doesn’t mean you can violate the child custody order. Similarly, if your ex doesn’t let you see your child, you still have to pay support. If you want to enforce a child custody agreement or enforce child support issues, you should go to family law court instead of taking matters into your own hands. Talk to a child support attorney or law firm for legal advice about your child support case and legal issues.

What does child support cover?

A judge will order child support payments to make sure all of your child’s needs are met when you and your ex are no longer together and spending money. These payments can help cover expenses for your child like school, health care, food, clothing, housing, and more.

How much is child support?

Each state calculates child support according to its formula. This formula will take into account your earnings, your ex’s earnings, and your child’s financial needs for things like school, health care, food, and other necessities. A child support lawyer will be able to better help you anticipate what you expect to either owe or receive in child support payments.

How does child support affect my taxes?

Because child support payments are solely for the child’s benefit, they do not affect tax filings. If you pay child support, you cannot deduct those payments from your income, and if you receive child support, those payments will not count toward your taxable income. If you are late on child support payments, your state may intercept your tax refund to help pay off those debts.

How can I change my child support payments?

If you feel you pay too much child support or receive too little, you must prove a “substantial” change in circumstances to change your child support obligations. This means major changes will need to happen to either your or your ex’s income or your child’s financial needs. Some changes that can bring about a modification of support could include a raise, losing a job, or a serious illness.

What sort of issues can I seek legal help with?

Specialized legal help is available for most legal issues. Each case is unique; seeking legal help is a smart first step toward understanding your legal situation and seeking the best path toward resolution for your case. An experienced lawyer understands the local laws surrounding your case and what your best legal options might be. More importantly, there are certain situations and circumstances – such as being charged with a crime – where you should always seek experienced legal help.

What to Expect from an Initial Consultation

  • Seek to determine whether the attorney can represent you. There is no one-size-fits-all legal solution and it may turn out your needs are better served by an attorney in a different specialization.
  • It’s important to find a legal ally who is both competent in the law and someone you can trust to protect your interests.
  • Discuss how the practice’s billing works and discuss possible additional charges or fees that may arise during or after the resolution of your case.

An attorney consultation should provide you with enough information so that you can make an informed decision on whether to proceed with legal help.

Does firm size matter?

For most consumer legal issues, the size of the practice is much less important than the experience, competence, and reputation of the attorney(s) handling your case. Among the most important factors when choosing an attorney are your comfort level with the attorney or practice and the attorney’s track record in bringing about quick, successful resolutions to cases similar to yours.

Common legal terms explained

Personal jurisdiction – Requirement that a particular court have authority over a person, in order to bind that person to the judgment of the court, based on minimum contacts. International Shoe Co v. Washington is a landmark Supreme Court case outlining the scope of a state court’s reach in personal jurisdiction.

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