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Top New Orleans, LA Child Custody Lawyers Near You

Child Custody Lawyers | New Orleans Office

201 St. Charles Ave, Suite 2500, New Orleans, LA 70170

Child Custody Lawyers | Metairie Office | Serving New Orleans, LA

3636 S I-10 Service Rd W, Suite 216, Metairie, LA 70001

Child Custody Lawyers | New Orleans Office

650 Poydras St, Suite 2200, New Orleans, LA 70130

Child Custody Lawyers | Kenner Office | Serving New Orleans, LA

3309 Williams Blvd, Kenner, LA 70065

Child Custody Lawyers | Metairie Office | Serving New Orleans, LA

111 Veterans Memorial Blvd, Suite 1400, Metairie, LA 70005

Child Custody Lawyers | New Orleans Office

701 Loyola Ave, Suite 403, New Orleans, LA 70156

Child Custody Lawyers | Luling Office | Serving New Orleans, LA

50 Wade St, Ste 9, Luling, LA 70070

Child Custody Lawyers | Metairie Office | Serving New Orleans, LA

3000 18th St, Metairie, LA 70002-4903

Child Custody Lawyers | New Orleans Office

Hancock Whitney Center, 40th Floor, 701 Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70139-7749

Child Custody Lawyers | New Orleans Office

839 St. Charles Avenue, Suite 306, New Orleans, LA 70130

Child Custody Lawyers | New Orleans Office

820 O'Keefe Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70113

Child Custody Lawyers | New Orleans Office

701 Poydras Street, Suite 3600, New Orleans, LA 70139-7735

Child Custody Lawyers | New Orleans Office

1100 Poydras St, Suite 2010, New Orleans, LA 70163

Child Custody Lawyers | Covington Office | Serving New Orleans, LA

Northlake Corp Park Ste 103, 1001 Service Rd E Hwy 190, Covington, LA 70433

Child Custody Lawyers | Metairie Office | Serving New Orleans, LA

3713 Airline Dr, Metairie, LA 70001-5836

Child Custody Lawyers | Metairie Office | Serving New Orleans, LA

1 Galleria Boulevard, Suite 1100, Metairie, LA 70001-7534

Child Custody Lawyers | New Orleans Office

400 Poydras Street, Suite 1540, New Orleans, LA 70130-3225

Child Custody Lawyers | New Orleans Office

909 Poydras St, Suite 1500, New Orleans, LA 70112-4016

Child Custody Lawyers | Metairie Office | Serving New Orleans, LA

3501 N Causeway Blvd, Suite 500, Metairie, LA 70002-8345

Child Custody Lawyers | Gretna Office | Serving New Orleans, LA

230 Huey P Long Ave, Gretna, LA 70053

Child Custody Lawyers | Chalmette Office | Serving New Orleans, LA

3 Courthouse Square, Chalmette, LA 70043-4773

New Orleans Child Custody Information

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Lead Counsel Verified Attorneys In New Orleans

Lead Counsel independently verifies Child Custody attorneys in New Orleans and checks their standing with Louisiana bar associations.

Our Verification Process and Criteria
  • Ample Experience Attorneys must meet stringent qualifications and prove they practice in the area of law they’re verified in.
  • Good Standing Be in good standing with their bar associations and maintain a clean disciplinary record.
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Find a Child Custody Attorney near New Orleans

Visit our free Child Custody Resource Center.

Shared Custody and Visitation

When parents of a child are separated or get a divorce, they have to determine the child’s custody and visitation rights. Custody arrangements can include shared custody or sole custody. Joint legal custody and joint physical custody mean the parents both have the right to make legal decisions for the child and share physical time with the child. Even when both parents have shared custody, the parent who spends the most time with the child is generally considered the custodial parent. The other parent has visitation rights and can see the child based on the visitation schedule and custody order.

Legal Issues in Child Custody Disputes

When parents cannot agree on a child custody agreement that works for everybody, they may have to go to court to have family law matters decided. In most cases, the court will first have the parents go through mediation to work together on a schedule. If mediation does not work, the court may decide the custody and visitation arrangement.

How Do Judges Decide Child Custody

Family court judges must consider what is in the best interests of the child when determining custody. The court can consider several factors, including the child’s relationship with the parents, the parents’ work schedules, the child’s wishes, siblings and extended family, distance between parents, cooperation of the parents, safety and stability, and any other relevant factors. In most cases, judges emphasize making sure the child will spend time with both parents. To make this happen, a judge will likely want to know what each parent’s home environment is like, whether each parent will be able to give a child the proper attention, and in which situation the child will be most likely to thrive.

Taking Away Parental Rights

Parents can lose their parenting rights if the child is abused, abandoned, or in an unsafe environment. A parent or the state can petition for a termination of parental rights. The other parent will have a chance to respond in court to present their side of the story. Grounds for terminating parental rights include abuse, neglect, or abandonment.

Can I Change a Child Custody Order?

If both parents are unhappy with the current custody arrangement, you can negotiate a change to your agreement or modify the child custody order. If a family law judge feels that the changes are in the child’s best interests and benefits outweigh any negative impacts, then the court may modify the child custody order. If you want to change a child custody order and the other parent disagrees, you may need to show a substantial change in circumstances to justify the change. This could include one of the parents moving out of state, suffering from a disability or illness that affects their parenting ability, domestic violence, exposing the child to an unsafe environment, or having a change in work circumstances that requires rescheduling visitation.

What If My Ex Isn’t Paying Child Support?

It can be very difficult for a custodial parent to take proper care of their child if the other parent isn’t paying their fair share. However, in most cases, a parent’s failure to pay child support or spousal support is not enough to deny visitation. If your ex isn’t paying support, you can contact your Louisiana child support program to enforce child support orders.

How a Louisiana Child Custody Attorney Can Help

A family law attorney can help you resolve your custody legal issue and guide you through the process. Child custody lawyers can help you navigate the legal system, while avoiding costly mistakes or procedural errors. For legal advice on your custody issues, you should look for a family law firm with a practice area that focuses on Louisiana child custody cases like yours.

What do judges look for in custody cases?

In every state, family court judges must consider what is in the child’s best interests when determining custody. In most cases, judges emphasize making sure the child will spend ample time with both parents. To make this happen, a judge will likely want to know what each parent’s home environment is like, whether each parent will be able to give a child the proper attention, and which situation the child will be most likely to thrive in.

Who has legal custody of the child when the parents aren’t married?

If the parents are not married, the child’s biological parents both have parental rights unless the law says otherwise. An exception to this could be if no father is listed on the child’s birth certificate. In that case, the father would have to go through the legal process of establishing paternity to be able to assert his parental rights for visitation.

How can a mother lose custody of her child?

A mother can lose custody of her child in much the same way a father could. This could include abusing the child, abusing drugs or alcohol, providing an unsafe home environment for the child, or abandoning the child.

How can you change a child custody order?

If you or your ex are unhappy with the current custody arrangement, you can negotiate a change to your agreement. If a judge feels that the changes are still in the child’s best interests, then they may approve the order. If one of you is pressing ahead with seeking a change and the other parent is contesting it, you will need to prove a “substantial” change in circumstances. This could include one of the parents moving out of state, suffering from a disability or illness that affects their parenting ability, exposing the child to an unsafe environment, or having a change in work circumstances that requires rescheduling of visitation.

When to Hire a Lawyer

It is in your best interest to get legal help early on in addressing your situation. There are times when hiring a lawyer quickly is critical to your case, such as if you are charged with a crime. It may also be in your best interest to have a lawyer review the fine print before signing legal documents. A lawyer can also help you get the compensation you deserve if you’ve suffered a serious injury. For issues where money or property is at stake, having a lawyer guide you through the complexities of the legal system can save you time, hassle, and possibly a lot of grief in the long run.

The Importance of a Good Consultation

The goal of an initial consultation is to find an attorney you are comfortable working with and someone who can help you understand your options under the law. Seek to understand the relevant legal experience the attorney brings to your case. While it is not realistic to expect an attorney to resolve your legal issue during an initial consultation, you should gain a level of comfort with his/her ability to do so. A good consultation can clarify issues, raise pertinent questions and considerations for your case, and help you make an informed decision towards resolving your legal issue.

Types of legal fees:

Bill by the hour: Many attorneys bill by the hour. How much an attorney bills you per hour will vary based on a number of factors. For instance, an attorney’s hourly fee may fluctuate based on whether that hour is spent representing you in court or doing research on your case. Attorneys in one practice area may bill you more than attorneys in a different practice area.

Contingent fee: Some lawyers will accept payment via contingent fee. In this arrangement, the lawyer receives a percentage of the total monetary recovery if you win your lawsuit. In sum, the lawyer only gets paid if you win. Contingent fee agreements are limited to specific practice areas in civil law.

Flat fee: For “routine” legal work where the attorney generally knows the amount of time and resources necessary to complete the task, he/she may be willing to bill you a flat fee for services performed.

Common legal terms explained

Pro se – This Latin term refers to representing yourself in court instead of hiring professional legal counsel. Pro se representation can occur in either criminal or civil cases.

Statute – Refers to a law created by a legislative body. For example, the laws enacted by Congress are statutes.

Subject matter jurisdiction – Requirement that a particular court have authority to hear the claim based on the specific type of issue brought to the court. For example, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court only has subject matter jurisdiction over bankruptcy filings, therefore it does not have the authority to render binding judgment over other types of cases, such as divorce.

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