Top Phoenix, AZ Bank Fraud Lawyers Near You

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Phoenix Office

2720 E Camelback Rd, Suite 210, Phoenix, AZ 85016

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Phoenix Office

2 N. Central Ave, 18th Floor, Suite 1929, Phoenix, AZ 85004

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Phoenix Office

2415 E Camelback Rd, Suite 700, Phoenix, AZ 85016

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Mesa Office | Serving Phoenix, AZ

1731 West Baseline Rd. Suite #101, Mesa, AZ 85202

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Phoenix Office

2425 East Camelback Road, Suite 900, Phoenix, AZ 85016

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Phoenix Office

2111 East Highland Avenue, Suite B-250, Phoenix, AZ 85016

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Phoenix Office

714 N. 3rd St., Suite 4, Phoenix, AZ 85004

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Phoenix Office

2025 N. 3rd Street, Suite 157, Phoenix, AZ 85004

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Phoenix Office

2398 E Camelback Road, Suite 540, Phoenix, AZ 85016

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Phoenix Office

1850 North Central Avenue, Suite 1400, Phoenix, AZ 85004

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Phoenix Office

3200 N Central Ave, Suite 1600, Phoenix, AZ 85012

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Tempe Office | Serving Phoenix, AZ

4500 S Lakeshore Dr, Suite 352, Tempe, AZ 85282

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Scottsdale Office | Serving Phoenix, AZ

7322 E. Thomas Road, Scottsdale, AZ 85251

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Phoenix Office

One Renaissance Square, 2 N. Central Ave., Suite 1450, Phoenix, AZ 85004

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Phoenix Office

2916 North 7th Avenue, Phoenix, AZ 85013

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Phoenix Office

400 E Van Buren St, Suite 1900, Phoenix, AZ 85004

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Phoenix Office

2700 N Central Ave, Suite 1000, Phoenix, AZ 85004

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Phoenix Office

3200 N Central Ave, Suite 2250, Phoenix, AZ 85012

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Scottsdale Office | Serving Phoenix, AZ

7272 East Indian School Road, Suite 203, Scottsdale, AZ 85251

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Phoenix Office

PO Box 431, Phoenix, AZ 85001

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Phoenix Office

20 E Thomas Rd, Ste 2200, Phoenix, AZ 85012

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Phoenix Office

6122 N 7th St, Suite D, Phoenix, AZ 85014

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Tempe Office | Serving Phoenix, AZ

PO Box 447, Tempe, AZ 85280

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Tempe Office | Serving Phoenix, AZ

80 E Rio Salado Pkwy, Suite 305, Tempe, AZ 85281

Bank Fraud Lawyers | Phoenix Office

2 North Central Avenue, Suite 400, Phoenix, AZ 85004

Phoenix Bank Fraud Information

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Lead Counsel Verified Attorneys In Phoenix

Lead Counsel independently verifies Bank Fraud attorneys in Phoenix and checks their standing with Arizona bar associations.

Our Verification Process and Criteria
  • Ample Experience Attorneys must meet stringent qualifications and prove they practice in the area of law they’re verified in.
  • Good Standing Be in good standing with their bar associations and maintain a clean disciplinary record.
  • Annual Review Submit to an annual review to retain their Lead Counsel Verified status.
  • Client Commitment Pledge to follow the highest quality client service and ethical standards.

Find a Bank Fraud Attorney near Phoenix

The Average Total Federal Prison Sentence for Bank Fraud in Arizona

12.43 months*

* based on 2019 Individual Offenders - Federal Court sentencing in Arizona federal courts. See Sentencing Data Information for complete details.

What Is Bank Fraud?

Bank fraud is usually a crime in which the offender knowingly commits, or attempts to commit, a scheme involving theft from either a financial institution or money or property which said financial institution is in the lawful custody of (such as a bank client’s savings account).

What Are Some Different Types of Bank Fraud?

There are several different types of bank fraud. Accounting fraud takes place when a business or sole proprietorship attempts to secure a loan from a bank, credit union or other financial institution. While this may be a perfectly legitimate loan on the surface, accounting fraud takes place when the financial representative of the business knowingly lies or misrepresents their ledger to the bank’s loan officer essentially promoting their business as more solvent, profitable or otherwise qualified to take out a loan which they would not have secured had they been honest about their finances. Accounting fraud can also be a form of loan fraud.

Loan fraud takes place either when an individual or business misrepresents their ledger to gain an advantage in a borrowing negotiation, but it can also occur if a criminal, using tactics related to identity theft, presents themselves as another person in order to garner an illegitimate loan.

ATM fraud can occur if a thief uses a skimmer, or another form of technology or technological expertise, to hack or reprogram the machine itself. Once the software or firmware security measures protecting that particular ATM machine are cracked, the criminals help themselves to the cash deposited. ATM fraud can also take place if an individual places an empty envelope (or envelopes) into the machine, claiming an illegitimate deposit. The envelopes being empty, the offender then removes as much money from the false deposit as allowable.

Is Bank Fraud a Felony or a Misdemeanor?

Bank fraud is considered to be a felony at the federal level, and at the state level, whether an incident of alleged bank fraud is categorized as either a felony charge or a misdemeanor charge depends upon the jurisdiction and circumstances.

Most instances of bank fraud become felony offenses, but misdemeanor charges can result. For example, in some states, the crime of forgery falls under the umbrella of bank fraud and can be constituted as a Class A misdemeanor in certain circumstances. Provided that the forged instrument is not a bond, deed, will, debit or credit card, mortgage, contract, release, stock, currency or government-issued, the crime could be considered a Class A misdemeanor.

What Is the Punishment for Bank Fraud?

The maximum penalty in response to a charge of bank fraud at the federal level is 30 years imprisonment, as well as a fine of up to $1 million.

State statutes vary in how they treat crimes related to bank fraud, and each case can be different. To use forgery, for instance, the penalty for the third-degree felony is a fine of no more than $10,000 in addition to a prison sentence of between two to 10 years. A misdemeanor can result in a maximum sentence of one year in jail as well as potential fines of up to $4,000.

That being said, almost all bank fraud cases are prosecuted at the federal level due to the fact that most financial institutions are protected by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC).

How to Choose a Bank Fraud Lawyer

Charges related to bank fraud are generally considered to be serious allegations with severe punishments upon conviction. If you are facing such charges, it would be wise to secure the services of a skilled criminal defense lawyer specializing in white-collar crime cases.

An experienced attorney focusing on fraud cases will be familiar with pre-existing precedent, and attorney-client privilege will allow you to divulge all material evidence and opinions to your legal representative in private.

Do your due diligence by investigating all potential attorneys you’re considering as representation, digging deep into their credentials, courtroom track record and any appearances in media. Speak to your local legal association, legal aid department, and other avenues of relevance in order to build the best profile possible before making your decision.

Have You Been Charged With Embezzling or Defrauding a Bank?

Embezzlement relates to the deceitful disclosure of assets for illegal conversion of funds. Frequently, embezzlement involves employee theft from a financial institution. Bank fraud is fraudulent activity through a banking institution for the purpose of profiting by the deceit. An example is a bank manager who issues a false letter of credit so that he or she can induce others to lend money or extend credit.

Bank Fraud and Embezzle Legal Help

Bank fraud and embezzlement are federal crimes and can result in harsh prison terms. Talk to an attorney to learn how you can protect your legal rights and prepare your defense to the charges.

Top Questions to Ask When Hiring an Attorney

  • How many years have you been practicing law? How long have you practiced law in the local area?
  • How many cases similar to mine have you handled in the past?
  • What is the likely outcome for my case?

In legal practice, experience matters. An experienced attorney will likely have handled issues similar to yours many, many times. Therefore, after listening to your situation, the attorney should have a reasonable idea of the time line for a case like yours and the likely resolution.

How to Prepare for Your Initial Consultation

Prepare for your consultation by writing down notes of your understanding of the case, jot down questions and concerns for the attorney, and gather your documents. Remember that you are trying to get a sense of whether the attorney has your trust and can help you address your legal issues. Questions should include how the attorney intends to resolve your issue, how many years he/she has been practicing law and specifically practicing in your area, as well as how many cases similar to yours the attorney has handled. It can also be helpful to broach the subject of fees so that you understand the likely cost and structure of your representation by a specific attorney and/or legal team.

Types of legal fees:

Bill by the hour: Many attorneys bill by the hour. How much an attorney bills you per hour will vary based on a number of factors. For instance, an attorney’s hourly fee may fluctuate based on whether that hour is spent representing you in court or doing research on your case. Attorneys in one practice area may bill you more than attorneys in a different practice area.

Contingent fee: Some lawyers will accept payment via contingent fee. In this arrangement, the lawyer receives a percentage of the total monetary recovery if you win your lawsuit. In sum, the lawyer only gets paid if you win. Contingent fee agreements are limited to specific practice areas in civil law.

Flat fee: For “routine” legal work where the attorney generally knows the amount of time and resources necessary to complete the task, he/she may be willing to bill you a flat fee for services performed.

Common legal terms explained

Affidavit – A sworn written statement made under oath. An affidavit is meant to be a supporting document to the court assisting in the verification of certain facts. An affidavit may or may not require notarization.

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