Skip to main content

Top Cincinnati, OH Adoption Lawyers Near You

Adoption Lawyers | Springboro Office | Serving Cincinnati, OH

345 North Main Street Unit 2, Springboro, OH 45066

Adoption Lawyers | Mason Office | Serving Cincinnati, OH

5740 Gateway Boulevard, Mason, OH 45040

Adoption Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

114 E 8th St, 2nd Floor, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Adoption Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

8035 Hosbrook Road, Suite 200, Cincinnati, OH 45236

Adoption Lawyers | Batavia Office | Serving Cincinnati, OH

233 East Main Street, Suite #3, Batavia, OH 45103

Adoption Lawyers | Mason Office | Serving Cincinnati, OH

5300 Socialville-Foster Rd, Suite 140, Mason, OH 45040

Adoption Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

123 Boggs Lane, Cincinnati, OH 45246

Adoption Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

600 Vine Street, Suite 2500, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Adoption Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

312 Walnut Street, Suite 1800, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Adoption Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

425 Walnut Street, Suite 1800, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Adoption Lawyers | Fairfield Office | Serving Cincinnati, OH

1248 Nilles Rd, Suite 7, Fairfield, OH 45014

Adoption Lawyers | Amelia Office | Serving Cincinnati, OH

One East Main Street, Amelia, OH 45102

Adoption Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

8150 Corporate Park Drive, Suite 350, Cincinnati, OH 45242

Adoption Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

960 Mercantile Center, 120 East Fourth Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Adoption Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

PNC Center, Suite 1700, 201 East Fifth Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Adoption Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

810 Sycamore Street, Fourth Floor, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Adoption Lawyers | Springboro Office | Serving Cincinnati, OH

20 South Main Street, Springboro, OH 45066

Adoption Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

4226 Bridgetown Rd, Cincinnati, OH 45211

Adoption Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

2348 Victory Parkway, Cincinnati, OH 45206

Adoption Lawyers | West Chester Office | Serving Cincinnati, OH

8087 Cincinnati Dayton Road, Suite B, West Chester, OH 45069

Adoption Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

312 Walnut Street, Suite 1600, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Adoption Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

120 E. 4th Street, Suite 1250, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Adoption Lawyers | Hamilton Office | Serving Cincinnati, OH

616 Dayton Street, Hamilton, OH 45011

Adoption Lawyers | Franklin Office | Serving Cincinnati, OH

1063 East Second Street, PO Box 369, Franklin, OH 45005

Cincinnati Adoption Information

Lead Counsel Badge

Lead Counsel Verified Attorneys In Cincinnati

Lead Counsel independently verifies Adoption attorneys in Cincinnati and checks their standing with Ohio bar associations.

Our Verification Process and Criteria
  • Ample Experience Attorneys must meet stringent qualifications and prove they practice in the area of law they’re verified in.
  • Good Standing Be in good standing with their bar associations and maintain a clean disciplinary record.
  • Annual Review Submit to an annual review to retain their Lead Counsel Verified status.
  • Client Commitment Pledge to follow the highest quality client service and ethical standards.

Find an Adoption Attorney near Cincinnati

Visit our free Adoption Resource Center.

What Are the Different Types of Adoption in Ohio?

Adoption can be wonderful for parents or families who want to bring another person into their life. Adoption is not just for couples who cannot have children of their own. There are many different types of adoption, including public adoption, private adoption, independent adoption, international adoption, stepparent adoption, and grandparent adoption. Surrogacy may be another option where a mother carries a child for someone else. Each state has its own state laws for adoption.

Open Adoption or Closed Adoption?

In a closed adoption, the child does not meet or find out about their biological parents. With an open adoption, the adoptive parents and birth parents can remain in contact during the adopted child’s life. There are different degrees of how open an adoption can be, from sharing limited information about the child to regular visits with the birth parent. There are benefits and drawbacks to each type of adoption and a Ohio adoption attorney can give you legal advice about which option may be best for you.

Private Adoption or Ohio Adoption?

States provide adoption through the state child welfare agency or social services. Adoption through the state is generally known as public adoption or foster adoption. A public adoption can be much less expensive than private adoption but adoptive parents may have limited options and have to first get approved under the Ohio foster care program. A private adoption involves working with a private adoption agency. An adoption agency works with the adoptive parents and the birth parent to go through the adoption legal process. Private adoption requires approval by the adoption agency under their own policies. Private adoption can be much more expensive than public adoption, with adoptive parents paying adoption fees, legal fees, travel expenses, and medical expenses.

What Happens in the Adoption Process?

The adoption process can take a long time and the process may be different depending on the type of adoption. Adoption through the foster care system may take as little as a few months. However, parents who are waiting to adopt a young child or newborn may wait years. International adoptions may also take longer than domestic adoptions. Adoption begins with finding the right adoption agency, either public or private. The adoption agency will conduct a home study and initial certification to approve the adoptive parents. When there is a match for the adopted child, the child can be placed with the family during a supervisory or probationary period. After follow-up visits and approval, the parents can complete the legal process for formal adoption.

How Does a Stepparent Get an Adoption?

Adoption by a stepparent or family member can be an option for families that are already related to the child. In a stepparent adoption, someone who gets married to someone who has a child can go through the process of getting parenting rights to the stepchild. In a stepparent adoption, the other parent has to give up their parental rights to the stepparent. For example, if a mother of a child gets married to a new partner, the stepparent takes over the father’s rights and responsibilities.

Can Same-Sex Parents Adopt a Child?

Same-sex couples have the legal right to adopt a child in Ohio. However, LGBTQ+ parents may have fewer options for adoption. Religious adoption agencies are still able to refuse to allow same-sex adoptions. International adoption may also be limited for same-sex couples where the country’s law does not allow adoption by same-sex parents.

How Can I Adopt a Child in Another Country?

Some parents turn to international adoption to bring in a child from a foreign country. Adoption cases for children in other countries can be more complicated. In addition to following the adoption agency policies, adoptive parents have to comply with state adoption laws, the adoption laws of the child’s birth country, and U.S. immigration laws. Even after adoption, many countries require follow-up adoption reports on the child’s welfare.

What Happens if Adoptive Parents Get a Divorce?

When a child is adopted, the adoptive parents have full parenting rights of the child. If the adoptive parents then get a divorce, the divorce is handled just like any other divorce involving a child. The parents and the court will have to determine child custody, visitation, and child support just like any other parents. A family law attorney can give you more information about adoptive parents and divorce.

How Much Does Adoption Cost?

Adoption can be expensive and the costs of adoption depend on the type of adoption. Using a private adoption agency can be more expensive, up to $50,000. Adoption through the foster care system can be closer to $2,000 to $5,000. Adoption costs can include legal fees, home study costs, and agency fees. International adoption may have additional expenses, including international travel expenses. There may be tax credits available for adoption that can help offset the costs.

Top Questions to Ask When Hiring an Attorney

  • How many years have you been practicing law? How long have you practiced law in the local area?
  • How many cases similar to mine have you handled in the past?
  • What is the likely outcome for my case?

In legal practice, experience matters. An experienced attorney will likely have handled issues similar to yours many, many times. Therefore, after listening to your situation, the attorney should have a reasonable idea of the time line for a case like yours and the likely resolution.

How to Prepare for Your Initial Consultation

Prepare for your consultation by writing down notes of your understanding of the case, jot down questions and concerns for the attorney, and gather your documents. Remember that you are trying to get a sense of whether the attorney has your trust and can help you address your legal issues. Questions should include how the attorney intends to resolve your issue, how many years he/she has been practicing law and specifically practicing in your area, as well as how many cases similar to yours the attorney has handled. It can also be helpful to broach the subject of fees so that you understand the likely cost and structure of your representation by a specific attorney and/or legal team.

Points to Consider Before Hiring a Lawyer

Experience. Regardless of the type of legal matter you need help with, an experienced attorney will usually be able to get you better results.

Competence. Determine an attorney’s expertise by asking about their track record for the issue you need help with resolving.

Fit. There are plenty of good attorneys out there; make sure you find one you are comfortable working with.

Common legal terms explained

Pro se – This Latin term refers to representing yourself in court instead of hiring professional legal counsel. Pro se representation can occur in either criminal or civil cases.

Statute – Refers to a law created by a legislative body. For example, the laws enacted by Congress are statutes.

Subject matter jurisdiction – Requirement that a particular court have authority to hear the claim based on the specific type of issue brought to the court. For example, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court only has subject matter jurisdiction over bankruptcy filings, therefore it does not have the authority to render binding judgment over other types of cases, such as divorce.

Page Generated: 0.25629615783691 sec