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Top Cincinnati, OH Tax Lawyers Near You

Tax Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

201 East Fifth Street, Suite 1900, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Tax Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

301 East Fourth Street, Suite 3300, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Tax Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

123 Boggs Lane, Cincinnati, OH 45246

Tax Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

600 Vine Street, Suite 2500, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Tax Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

312 Walnut Street, Suite 1800, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Tax Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

425 Walnut Street, Suite 1800, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Tax Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

425 Walnut Street, Suite 2200, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Tax Lawyers | Mason Office | Serving Cincinnati, OH

4743 Gallop Run, Mason, OH 45040

Tax Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

221 E. 4th Street, Suite 2300, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Tax Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

625 Eden Park Dr, Suite 450, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Tax Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

10979 Reed Hartman Highway, Suite 239, Cincinnati, OH 45242

Tax Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

2900 Carew Tower, 441 Vine Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Tax Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

8150 Corporate Park Drive, Suite 350, Cincinnati, OH 45242

Tax Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

901 Adams Crossing, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Tax Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

221 E 4th St, Suite 2500, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Tax Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

4270 Ivy Pointe Blvd, Suite 225, Cincinnati, OH 45245

Tax Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

7850 Five Mile Road, Cincinnati, OH 45230

Tax Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

PNC Center, Suite 1700, 201 East Fifth Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Tax Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

150 E 4th St, 4th Floor, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Tax Lawyers | Mason Office | Serving Cincinnati, OH

5325 Deerfield Blvd., Mason, OH 45040

Tax Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

312 Walnut Street, Suite 2450, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Tax Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

250 East Fifth Street, Suite 2200, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Tax Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

312 Walnut St, Suite 1400, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Tax Lawyers | Cincinnati Office

312 Elm St, Suite 2200, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Cincinnati Tax Information

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Lead Counsel Verified Attorneys In Cincinnati

Lead Counsel independently verifies Tax attorneys in Cincinnati and checks their standing with Ohio bar associations.

Our Verification Process and Criteria
  • Ample Experience Attorneys must meet stringent qualifications and prove they practice in the area of law they’re verified in.
  • Good Standing Be in good standing with their bar associations and maintain a clean disciplinary record.
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Visit our free Tax Law Resource Center.

How Do I Deal With Tax Issues in Ohio?

Dealing with tax issues can be confusing and frustrating. Your taxes may seem to go up every year and end up getting less in your tax refund. To make it more complicated, tax laws keep changing and you are expected to make sure you comply with all the updates and pay your taxes by the deadline. While you do not want to overpay on your taxes, it is also important to make sure you pay the full amount of your tax payments you may end up in tax debt. If you owe money to the IRS, they will try and collect through tax liens, levies, or even garnishment of your wages. Unpaid taxes can also get hit with tax penalties and interest on the debt that continues to make your tax debt grow. No matter what your tax issue may be, speaking with a Cincinnati tax attorney will help you understand the current tax laws.

Federal Tax Issues

Income taxes at the federal level are administered by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). The IRS reviews individual and business tax records and tax filings. If there are inconsistencies between a taxpayer’s return and what is reported to the IRS, the IRS may contact the taxpayer to review the tax issue or send a tax bill. If a business or individual has to go to tax court to deal with tax disputes, a tax litigation attorney can represent the taxpayer. If the taxpayer does not file their taxes or does not pay their taxes on time, the IRS may send a notice to the taxpayer and include failure to pay penalties, underpayment penalties, failure to file penalties. If the IRS suspects fraud, there are additional tax fraud penalties and the individual could even be charged with criminal tax fraud. Businesses may also have to deal with federal tax issues. Most small businesses, partnerships, and corporations have to pay federal taxes, which can be even more complicated than personal income taxes. Tax planning can help a company reduce its tax burden but the IRS may dispute the company’s taxes, including accounting methods, depreciation, deductions, and claimed tax credits.

OhioTax Issues

In addition to federal taxes, there are also state tax issues. In some cases, the city or county may have additional local tax requirements. Even in states without income tax, there may be issues involving real estate tax, estate planning taxes, and corporate taxes. Other state tax issues may include driver’s license holds, residency disputes, or use tax issues. For state tax problems, you can get a consultation with a tax law lawyer in your area for legal advice.

How Do I File for a Tax Extension?

If you need to file an extension because you can’t file your taxes by April 15, you can file a form requesting an extension through your tax professional, CPA, online tax services, or on the IRS website. An extension gives you more time to file your tax return but it does not extend your time to pay. When filing an extension, you have to estimate your tax liability and pay the tax estimate or else you may face late payment penalties and interest.

What Taxes Do I Owe?

Determining what taxes you owe depends on your situation. If you make over a certain amount of money, taxpayers owe state and federal income tax. Income tax includes income from any source, which includes wages, interest income, and even gambling winnings. Taxpayers also owe a portion of their payroll taxes, including Social Security and Medicare. Payroll taxes are generally taken out of the worker’s paycheck.

Do I Have To Pay Taxes if I’m Self-Employed?

If you are self-employed as an independent contractor or because you own your own business, you will likely need to make quarterly filings of your estimated taxes. This will account for your income, Social Security, and Medicare taxes. Self-employed taxpayers will be responsible for paying payroll taxes that are normally split between the worker and the company. As a self-employed taxpayer, you can also take advantage of certain deductions that are part of your business expenses. A tax lawyer can give you more legal advice on filing taxes for the self-employed.

What Can I Do if I Can’t Pay My Tax Bill?

If you can’t pay your tax bill, it is better to get help instead of just ignoring it. If you ignore your tax bill, your tax debt will continue to increase with interest and penalties. If the IRS wants to collect the tax debt, they can levy your accounts and put a tax lien on your property. You may be able to negotiate a tax settlement with the IRS, including a payment plan or offer in compromise. An offer in compromise allows taxpayers to lower their tax liability if they are qualified and the IRS agrees to the settlement. An installment plan agreement does not lower tax liability but sets up a payment plan to avoid a tax lien.

What Happens If You Get an IRS Tax Audit?

A tax audit is an examination of the taxpayer’s accounts and financial records. An IRS audit involves reviewing the taxpayer’s information to make sure the taxes are reported correctly. Tax audits can be based on suspicious returns flagged by a computer program or they can be random. If you get notice of a tax audit in the mail and you suspect there may be a problem, you can contact a tax law firm for an initial consultation about your rights and options.

Where is my tax refund?

The IRS now allows you to track the status of your tax refund. In some cases it may take weeks to process and post to your account. If you feel like you deserve a refund but ended up owing taxes, you should consider talking to a tax professional or attorney about whether you have any deductions available to you that you did not take advantage of.

How do you file for a tax extension?

You can file a form requesting an extension through your tax professional, tax software that you use, or on the IRS website. Any filer can request an extension, but when making the request you must estimate your tax liability and pay it, otherwise you could incur late penalties.

What taxes do you owe?

Determining what taxes you owe depends on your situation. Most people owe state and federal income taxes, Social Security taxes, and Medicare taxes. However, if you own a business, your company may also owe sales and payroll taxes.

How much tax do you pay if you are self-employed?

If you are self-employed, either as an independent contractor or because you own your own business, you will likely need to make quarterly filings of your estimated taxes. This will account for your income, Social Security, and Medicare taxes. If your net earnings are $400 or more, you will typically need to file an income tax return. There are situations where you may have to file even if you make less than that.

Top Questions to Ask When Hiring an Attorney

  • How many years have you been practicing law? How long have you practiced law in the local area?
  • How many cases similar to mine have you handled in the past?
  • What is the likely outcome for my case?

In legal practice, experience matters. An experienced attorney will likely have handled issues similar to yours many, many times. Therefore, after listening to your situation, the attorney should have a reasonable idea of the time line for a case like yours and the likely resolution.

How to Prepare for Your Initial Consultation

Prepare for your consultation by writing down notes of your understanding of the case, jot down questions and concerns for the attorney, and gather your documents. Remember that you are trying to get a sense of whether the attorney has your trust and can help you address your legal issues. Questions should include how the attorney intends to resolve your issue, how many years he/she has been practicing law and specifically practicing in your area, as well as how many cases similar to yours the attorney has handled. It can also be helpful to broach the subject of fees so that you understand the likely cost and structure of your representation by a specific attorney and/or legal team.

Types of legal fees:

Bill by the hour: Many attorneys bill by the hour. How much an attorney bills you per hour will vary based on a number of factors. For instance, an attorney’s hourly fee may fluctuate based on whether that hour is spent representing you in court or doing research on your case. Attorneys in one practice area may bill you more than attorneys in a different practice area.

Contingent fee: Some lawyers will accept payment via contingent fee. In this arrangement, the lawyer receives a percentage of the total monetary recovery if you win your lawsuit. In sum, the lawyer only gets paid if you win. Contingent fee agreements are limited to specific practice areas in civil law.

Flat fee: For “routine” legal work where the attorney generally knows the amount of time and resources necessary to complete the task, he/she may be willing to bill you a flat fee for services performed.

Common legal terms explained

Personal jurisdiction – Requirement that a particular court have authority over a person, in order to bind that person to the judgment of the court, based on minimum contacts. International Shoe Co v. Washington is a landmark Supreme Court case outlining the scope of a state court’s reach in personal jurisdiction.

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