Top Center Point, AL Securities Fraud Lawyers Near You

Securities Fraud Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Center Point, AL

2107 5th Ave N., Suite 301, Birmingham, AL 35203

Securities Fraud Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Center Point, AL

505 North 20th Street, Suite 825, Birmingham, AL 35203

Securities Fraud Lawyers | Hoover Office | Serving Center Point, AL

101 Riverchase Parkway East, Hoover, AL 35244

Securities Fraud Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Center Point, AL

800 Shades Creek Pkwy, Suite 870, Birmingham, AL 35209

Securities Fraud Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Center Point, AL

2100 Southbridge Parkway, Suite 650, Birmingham, AL 35209

Securities Fraud Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Center Point, AL

500 Office Park Drive, Suite 100, Birmingham, AL 35223

Securities Fraud Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Center Point, AL

2001 Park Place, Suite 1300, Birmingham, AL 35203

Securities Fraud Lawyers | Clanton Office | Serving Center Point, AL

207 6th St N, Suite 4, Clanton, AL 35045

Securities Fraud Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Center Point, AL

PO Box 2261, Birmingham, AL 35201

Securities Fraud Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Center Point, AL

2127 1st Ave North, Birmingham, AL 35203

Securities Fraud Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Center Point, AL

2100 SouthBridge Parkway, Suite 650, Birmingham, AL 35209

Securities Fraud Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Center Point, AL

1929 3rd Ave N, Suite 500, Birmingham, AL 35203

Securities Fraud Lawyers | Pelham Office | Serving Center Point, AL

3590-B Pelham Pkwy, Suite 254, Pelham, AL 35124

Securities Fraud Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Center Point, AL

1 Chase Corporate Center, Suite 400, Birmingham, AL 35244

Securities Fraud Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Center Point, AL

1320 Alford Ave, Suite 202, Birmingham, AL 35226

Securities Fraud Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Center Point, AL

420 20th Street North, Suite 1100, Birmingham, AL 35203

Securities Fraud Lawyers | Pelham Office | Serving Center Point, AL

2163 Pelham Parkway, Pelham, AL 35124

Securities Fraud Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Center Point, AL

2100 1st Ave N, Suite 370, Birmingham, AL 35203

Securities Fraud Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Center Point, AL

2027 2nd Ave N, Suite A, Birmingham, AL 35203-4319

Securities Fraud Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Center Point, AL

2001 Park Place North, Suite 1500, Birmingham, AL 35203

Securities Fraud Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Center Point, AL

1400 21st Way S, Birmingham, AL 35205

Securities Fraud Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Center Point, AL

2320 Arlington Ave S, Birmingham, AL 35205

Securities Fraud Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Center Point, AL

1904 1st Ave N, Suite 300, Birmingham, AL 35203

Securities Fraud Lawyers | Bessemer Office | Serving Center Point, AL

1623 2nd Ave N, Bessemer, AL 35020

Center Point Securities Fraud Information

Lead Counsel Badge

Lead Counsel Verified Attorneys In Center Point

Lead Counsel independently verifies Securities Fraud attorneys in Center Point and checks their standing with Alabama bar associations.

Our Verification Process and Criteria
  • Ample Experience Attorneys must meet stringent qualifications and prove they practice in the area of law they’re verified in.
  • Good Standing Be in good standing with their bar associations and maintain a clean disciplinary record.
  • Annual Review Submit to an annual review to retain their Lead Counsel Verified status.
  • Client Commitment Pledge to follow the highest quality client service and ethical standards.

Find a Securities Fraud Attorney near Center Point

The Average Total Federal Prison Sentence for Securities Fraud in Alabama

25.42 months*

* based on 2019 Individual Offenders - Federal Court sentencing in Alabama federal courts. See Sentencing Data Information for complete details.

What Does the Law Say About Securities Fraud?

Securities fraud involves fraudulent misrepresentations in buying, selling, trading stock or other financial commodities. Securities fraud can also involve stock price manipulation to artificially inflate or deflate stock values. Securities fraud is a type of “white-collar crime,” which is a financially motivated, nonviolent crime.

Is Securities Fraud a Federal Crime?

Securities fraud is a federal offense, like mail fraud or wire fraud. Under securities law in the U.S. Code, it is a violation of the Securities Exchange Act to defraud any person in connection with any commodity. It is also a crime to execute a scheme to obtain money or property in connection with any stock commodity through misrepresentation, false pretenses, or fraudulent promises.

Securities fraud may also be a violation of Alabama state law. Many states have a law that mirrors the federal criminal statute. State agencies or state law enforcement may prosecute fraudulent securities practices that occur within state lines.

What Are Common Types of Securities Fraud?

Fraudulent security schemes can take a variety of forms. Common examples of securities fraud include:

  • Corporate fraud
  • Insider trading
  • Internet fraud
  • Short selling schemes
  • Ponzi schemes
  • Pump and dump

Corporate fraud generally involves misrepresentations made by corporate directors and executives. This may include misrepresentations or cooking the books to artificially inflate the company’s stock value. Corporate shareholders can then profit from selling the overpriced stock or selling the overvalued company. The Enron corporate fraud case is a famous example of corporate-level fraud.

A Ponzi scheme is an investment scheme where earlier investors are paid out returns out of the money from new investors. As long as the share of investors continues to increase, other investors can receive consistent profits. However, as soon as the new influx of money starts to slow down or dry up, the scheme falls apart and individual investors find out their life savings are gone.

How Does Someone Find Out About Securities Fraud?

In some cases, a financial scheme can go on for years before anyone suspects any criminal activity. Federal government agencies may suspect fraud because of suspicious financial transactions, excessive trading, or irregular tax filings. However, many securities fraud cases are reported by whistleblowers. The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has a whistleblower office for people to report possible fraud. Fraud may be reported by investors, employees, or even relatives who become aware of false securities claims.

Whistleblowers have an incentive to report insider trading or corporate fraud because the SEC provides monetary awards for individuals who report fraud that leads to SEC enforcement. Whistleblowers can receive up to 30% of the enforcement money collected.

Can You Go to Jail for Securities Fraud?

You can go to jail for securities fraud. Federal fraud statutes provide long prison sentences for felony fraud. Under U.S. law, a conviction for securities fraud can result in fines and imprisonment for up to 25 years. Depending on the fraud involved, securities violations may include other fraud charges, including:

There may also be civil penalties for fraud, which could result in fines, treble damages, and restitution for the victims of investment fraud.

How Can an Experienced Securities Lawyer Help?

If your business or investment activities are being investigated by a government agency, you may be under investigation for securities fraud. Securities fraud attorneys may be able to represent you during an investigation to make sure your legal rights are represented. If you are facing legal action, criminal defense lawyers can represent you in court.

Investment fraud lawyers can use the discovery process to review all the evidence in your case, talk to witnesses, and gather relevant records to build a strong legal defense. An investment fraud attorney may also be able to negotiate a plea agreement for the best possible outcome. A successful plea deal can have charges reduced, charges dropped, or reduce the criminal sentencing.

What sort of issues can I seek legal help with?

Specialized legal help is available for most legal issues. Each case is unique; seeking legal help is a smart first step toward understanding your legal situation and seeking the best path toward resolution for your case. An experienced lawyer understands the local laws surrounding your case and what your best legal options might be. More importantly, there are certain situations and circumstances – such as being charged with a crime – where you should always seek experienced legal help.

How to Prepare for Your Initial Consultation

Prepare for your consultation by writing down notes of your understanding of the case, jot down questions and concerns for the attorney, and gather your documents. Remember that you are trying to get a sense of whether the attorney has your trust and can help you address your legal issues. Questions should include how the attorney intends to resolve your issue, how many years he/she has been practicing law and specifically practicing in your area, as well as how many cases similar to yours the attorney has handled. It can also be helpful to broach the subject of fees so that you understand the likely cost and structure of your representation by a specific attorney and/or legal team.

Points to Consider Before Hiring a Lawyer

Experience. Regardless of the type of legal matter you need help with, an experienced attorney will usually be able to get you better results.

Competence. Determine an attorney’s expertise by asking about their track record for the issue you need help with resolving.

Fit. There are plenty of good attorneys out there; make sure you find one you are comfortable working with.

Common legal terms explained

Pro se – This Latin term refers to representing yourself in court instead of hiring professional legal counsel. Pro se representation can occur in either criminal or civil cases.

Statute – Refers to a law created by a legislative body. For example, the laws enacted by Congress are statutes.

Subject matter jurisdiction – Requirement that a particular court have authority to hear the claim based on the specific type of issue brought to the court. For example, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court only has subject matter jurisdiction over bankruptcy filings, therefore it does not have the authority to render binding judgment over other types of cases, such as divorce.

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