Top Washington Navy Yard, DC Larceny Lawyers Near You

Larceny Lawyers | Washington Office | Serving Washington Navy Yard, DC

1666 K St NW, Suite 1150, Washington, DC 20006

Larceny Lawyers | Washington Office | Serving Washington Navy Yard, DC

1155 F St NW, Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20004

Larceny Lawyers | Washington Office | Serving Washington Navy Yard, DC

600 New Hampshire Ave., NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC 20037-1931

Larceny Lawyers | Washington Office | Serving Washington Navy Yard, DC

1700 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Suite 200, Washington, DC 20006

Larceny Lawyers | Washington Office | Serving Washington Navy Yard, DC

2050 M Street NW, Washington, DC 20036

Larceny Lawyers | Washington Office | Serving Washington Navy Yard, DC

717 D Street NW, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20004

Larceny Lawyers | Washington Office | Serving Washington Navy Yard, DC

5335 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Suite 440, Washington, DC 20015

Larceny Lawyers | Washington Office | Serving Washington Navy Yard, DC

20 F Street NW, Suite 850, Washington, DC 20001

Larceny Lawyers | Washington Office | Serving Washington Navy Yard, DC

1050 Connecticut Avenue Northwest, Suite 65041, Washington, DC 20035

Larceny Lawyers | Washington Office | Serving Washington Navy Yard, DC

1325 G Street NW, Suite 500, Washington, DC 20004

Larceny Lawyers | Washington Office | Serving Washington Navy Yard, DC

101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20001

Larceny Lawyers | Washington Office | Serving Washington Navy Yard, DC

400 5th St NW, Suite 350, Washington, DC 20001

Larceny Lawyers | Washington Office | Serving Washington Navy Yard, DC

2001 K St NW, Suite 400 South, Washington, DC 20006

Larceny Lawyers | Washington Office | Serving Washington Navy Yard, DC

1825 Eye Street, NW, Suite 900, Washington, DC 20006

Larceny Lawyers | Washington Office | Serving Washington Navy Yard, DC

799 9th St NW, Suite 500, Washington, DC 20001

Larceny Lawyers | Washington Office | Serving Washington Navy Yard, DC

1001 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Suite 1300 South, Washington, DC 20004

Larceny Lawyers | Washington Office | Serving Washington Navy Yard, DC

1050 K Street NW, Suite 400, Washington, DC 20001

Larceny Lawyers | Washington Office | Serving Washington Navy Yard, DC

444 N. Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

Larceny Lawyers | Washington Office | Serving Washington Navy Yard, DC

1200 G St NW, Ste 800, Washington, DC 20005

Larceny Lawyers | Washington Office | Serving Washington Navy Yard, DC

1615 L St NW, Suite 1350, Washington, DC 20036

Larceny Lawyers | Washington Office | Serving Washington Navy Yard, DC

2001 K St NW, Washington, DC 20006

Larceny Lawyers | Washington Office | Serving Washington Navy Yard, DC

901 K Street NW, Suite 850, Washington, DC 20001

Larceny Lawyers | Washington Office | Serving Washington Navy Yard, DC

1717 K Street NW, Suite 900, Washington, DC 20006

Larceny Lawyers | Washington Office | Serving Washington Navy Yard, DC

600 New Hampshire Ave, Ste 610, Washington, DC 20037

Washington Navy Yard Larceny Information

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Find a Larceny Attorney near Washington Navy Yard

What Is the Definition of Larceny?

The crime of larceny involves taking property of another with the intent to deprive the owner of the property. Larceny is another term for theft and is a criminal offense. The penalties for a larceny conviction often depend on the value of the property taken. Larceny can involve any type of personal property, including money, vehicles, phones, antiques, or jewelry.

The elements to prove theft vary by state, with some states having a separate criminal charge for larceny. In general, larceny is the wrongful taking or withholding of any property from the possession of the owner with the intent to permanently deprive another person of the use or benefit.

What Are Different Types of Larceny?

Larceny is generally divided up into grand larceny or petty larceny. Also called grand theft or petty theft, the difference between grand and petty is generally based on value. Other types of grand theft may be based on the type of property. In some cases, theft of a motor vehicle or stealing a firearm may be considered grand larceny, not depending on the value.

Not all states have theft categorized as petty or grand. In some states, theft laws may be categorized by degree of larceny, such as first-degree larceny or class B misdemeanor sixth-degree larceny. Different degrees or classes of larceny offenses may be based on the value of stolen items and carry different criminal penalties.

What Is the Difference Between Theft and Larceny?

Larceny is a type of theft. In some cases, the terms are used interchangeably. However, theft is generally a broader term that may include other types of theft crimes, including embezzlement, identity theft, burglary, and fraud.

For example, larceny and embezzlement are both crimes of theft but the difference is that embezzlement usually involves theft by someone in a position of trust or authority over the property taken for personal gain.

Is Stealing From a Store Larceny?

Stealing from a store is generally a type of larceny. Also known as shoplifting, larceny from a store involves taking goods or merchandise from a store without paying the full price. Retail larceny could also be committed by employees who may have more opportunities to steal merchandise without getting caught.

Is Grand Larceny a Felony?

Grand larceny is often a felony but can sometimes be charged as a misdemeanor. As a felony, a criminal conviction for larceny could result in more than a year in prison and fines. As a misdemeanor, the maximum penalty for larceny is generally up to a year in jail and a fine. Other possible penalties include community service, probation, and victim restitution.

A felony criminal record may continue to negatively impact your life for years. A felony conviction may prevent firearm ownership and make it harder to get a job or find a place to live.

What Happens If Someone Presses Charges for Theft in District of Columbia?

If someone presses charges for theft, the state prosecutor or district attorney may file criminal charges. The victim of theft may also be able to file a civil lawsuit against the defendant to recover damages. In general, a civil lawsuit will come after the criminal charges. If you are found guilty of larceny in criminal court, through pleading guilty or after a guilty verdict, it will make it much easier for the original property owner to win a civil lawsuit for damages.

Do I Need To Hire a Lawyer if I’m Facing Larceny Charges?

If you are facing criminal charges, your options generally include pleading guilty or fighting the criminal charges. A criminal defense attorney can advise you of your rights to make sure you understand the consequences of each option. If you want to fight the criminal charges, your lawyer can build on legal defenses for theft to get the larceny charge dropped or create reasonable doubt for a not guilty verdict.

Your criminal defense lawyer may also be able to negotiate a beneficial plea agreement. A plea deal may allow you to avoid other criminal charges or get a reduced sentence. If you are a first-time offender, your defense attorney may be able to get you into a diversion program. A diversion program provides an alternative to criminal sentencing that allows the defendant to avoid jail time and a criminal conviction by following the terms and conditions of the program.

When to Hire a Lawyer

It is in your best interest to get legal help early on in addressing your situation. There are times when hiring a lawyer quickly is critical to your case, such as if you are charged with a crime. It may also be in your best interest to have a lawyer review the fine print before signing legal documents. A lawyer can also help you get the compensation you deserve if you’ve suffered a serious injury. For issues where money or property is at stake, having a lawyer guide you through the complexities of the legal system can save you time, hassle, and possibly a lot of grief in the long run.

Tips on Approaching an Initial Attorney Consultation

  • Use the consultation as a means of gaining a better understanding of your legal situation.
  • Ask the attorney how many cases similar to yours he/she has handled. An attorney’s experience and knowledge can speak to their expertise (or lack of) in addressing your situation.
  • Your attorney should be able to articulate roughly how long a case like yours will take to resolve and what sort of procedures to expect.
  • Determine how comfortable you are working with the lawyer and/or law firm.

Types of legal fees:

Bill by the hour: Many attorneys bill by the hour. How much an attorney bills you per hour will vary based on a number of factors. For instance, an attorney’s hourly fee may fluctuate based on whether that hour is spent representing you in court or doing research on your case. Attorneys in one practice area may bill you more than attorneys in a different practice area.

Contingent fee: Some lawyers will accept payment via contingent fee. In this arrangement, the lawyer receives a percentage of the total monetary recovery if you win your lawsuit. In sum, the lawyer only gets paid if you win. Contingent fee agreements are limited to specific practice areas in civil law.

Flat fee: For “routine” legal work where the attorney generally knows the amount of time and resources necessary to complete the task, he/she may be willing to bill you a flat fee for services performed.

Common legal terms explained

Affidavit – A sworn written statement made under oath. An affidavit is meant to be a supporting document to the court assisting in the verification of certain facts. An affidavit may or may not require notarization.

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