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Top Waialua, HI Homicide Lawyers Near You

Homicide Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waialua, HI

Topa Financial Center, 700 Bishop Street, Ste. 2100, Honolulu, HI 96813

Homicide Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waialua, HI

1003 Bishop Street, Pauahi Tower #2550, Honolulu, HI 96813

Homicide Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waialua, HI

Tissue Genesis Tower, 810 Richards Street, Suite 335, Honolulu, HI 96813-2902

Homicide Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waialua, HI

1088 Bishop St, Penthouse, Honolulu, HI 96813

Homicide Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waialua, HI

1001 Bishop Street, Suite 1800, Honolulu, HI 96813

Homicide Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waialua, HI

707 Richards St, Suite 625, Honolulu, HI 96813

Homicide Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waialua, HI

700 Bishop Street, Suite 2000, Honolulu, HI 96813

Homicide Lawyers | Kailua Office | Serving Waialua, HI

349 Illiania Street, Kailua, HI 96734

Homicide Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waialua, HI

Davies Pacific Center, 841 Bishop St., Suite 410, Honolulu, HI 96813

Homicide Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waialua, HI

Davies Pacific Center, 841 Bishop Street, Suite 1715, Honolulu, HI 96813

Homicide Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waialua, HI

851 Fort St. Suite 400, Honolulu, HI 96813

Homicide Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waialua, HI

Davies Pacific Center, 841 Bishop St., Suite 1065, Honolulu, HI 96813

Homicide Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waialua, HI

Nimitz Business Center, 1130 N Nimitz Hwy, Suite B-299, Honolulu, HI 96817

Homicide Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waialua, HI

1100 Alakea St, Alakea Corporate Tower, 20th Floor, Honolulu, HI 96813

Homicide Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waialua, HI

1003 Bishop St, Suite 2150, Honolulu, HI 96813

Homicide Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waialua, HI

Haseko Center, 820 Mililani St., Suite 714, Honolulu, HI 96813

Homicide Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waialua, HI

Davies Pacific Center, 841 Bishop St., Suite 2022, Honolulu, HI 96813

Homicide Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waialua, HI

Dillingham Transportation Bldg, 735 Bishop St., Suite 304, Honolulu, HI 96813

Homicide Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waialua, HI

Central Pacific Plaza, 220 S King St., Suite 2290, Honolulu, HI 96813

Waialua Homicide Information

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Lead Counsel Verified Attorneys In Waialua

Lead Counsel independently verifies Homicide attorneys in Waialua and checks their standing with Hawaii bar associations.

Our Verification Process and Criteria
  • Ample Experience Attorneys must meet stringent qualifications and prove they practice in the area of law they’re verified in.
  • Good Standing Be in good standing with their bar associations and maintain a clean disciplinary record.
  • Annual Review Submit to an annual review to retain their Lead Counsel Verified status.
  • Client Commitment Pledge to follow the highest quality client service and ethical standards.

Find a Homicide Attorney near Waialua

The Crime of Homicide

A charge of homicide does not necessarily mean someone intended to kill another person. There are several types of homicide crimes and each vary by the facts of the case and the jurisdiction. Aside from the act, the alleged perpetrator’s intent is also extremely important. Depending on the specifics of your case your attorney can help explain to you the charges against you and the various possible defenses to your case.

What Is Homicide?

Homicide takes place when one person kills another. Homicide may or may not be illegal, and this judgment is highly dependent on context.

For example, if a soldier on the battlefield shoots and kills an enemy combatant they have committed homicide, but their actions do not (ordinarily) constitute a crime. In some jurisdictions, if a home intruder is gunned down by the lawful resident, it may not be considered a crime — though homicide has occurred.

Criminal homicide, typically involving offenses such as murder (both first and second degree) as well as manslaughter (voluntary, involuntary, vehicular), refers to illegal forms of homicide.

What Is the Difference Between Murder and Homicide?

While all murders are instances of homicides, not all homicides are murders. Murder is by definition a crime, and a requisite element for murder charges is premeditation or malice. Homicide is not bound by any such stricture in terms of its definition.

An individual who plans to kill a longstanding enemy or rival, and then executes this plan, is guilty of murder — in this case, an illegal instance of homicide.

What Is the Difference Between Manslaughter and Homicide?

As with murder, all manslaughter cases involve homicide, but not all homicides involve manslaughter. Manslaughter is typically defined as an unlawful killing that was not premeditated or an unlawful killing that is the result of criminally reckless behavior (commonly known as a “depraved-heart” killing).

A person who finds their spouse engaged in the act of adultery, flies into a fit of rage and kills one of the other parties is likely to be charged with voluntary manslaughter — and they have committed a form of illegal homicide.

Is Homicide a Felony?

Homicide can either be a legal or illegal action depending on the circumstances. However, when considering illegal homicide such as murder or manslaughter, the charges are almost always classified as felony offenses due to the gravity of the crime (a life has been taken).

How Much Jail Time Can You Receive if You Commit Homicide?

Instances of illegal homicide vary greatly in terms of sentencing handed out in response to criminal convictions.

If you are found guilty of voluntary manslaughter (manslaughter committed in the heat of passion or during a fight, you could face up to 15 years in prison. Those convicted of involuntary manslaughter (that is, a death resulting from reckless behavior or similar negligence) may serve up to eight years behind bars. State statutes typically follow a similar sentencing scheme, though some jurisdictions allow for up to 15 years in prison for involuntary manslaughter.

Murder is treated even more seriously by both state and federal courts. Those found guilty of first-degree murder in federal court face life imprisonment or even the death penalty (in states which allow for this sentence to be executed). Those convicted of second-degree murder face any number of years in prison, or a life sentence alternatively.

Legal homicide, such as the examples provided earlier, does not carry a sentence.

Can a Lawyer Help With a Homicide Charge in Hawaii?

If you are facing charges related to illegal homicide of any nature, whether said charges are murder or manslaughter, it is strongly recommended that you seek experienced legal representation at your earliest opportunity.

A skilled criminal defense attorney familiar with homicide cases, established case law surrounding these and standing legal judgments or precedents, can be extremely useful in helping you to navigate the court system — increasing your chances of avoiding a conviction. Attorney-client privilege protects your discussions with your lawyer, allowing you to divulge all relevant information to them without fear of legal repercussions.

A conviction on charges of homicide is a very serious matter, as all offenses falling under this legal category are defined as felony offenses of the highest degree. A lengthy prison sentence, substantial monetary fines and even the death penalty can be the result if you are found guilty, and so it is vitally important to secure adequate, professional legal counsel.

Have You Been Charged With the Crime of Homicide?

If you have been charged with the crime of homicide, you will have the option to hire a homicide defense attorney or have one appointed to you. He or she can help protect your rights before and during the trial.

Top Questions to Ask When Hiring an Attorney

  • How many years have you been practicing law? How long have you practiced law in the local area?
  • How many cases similar to mine have you handled in the past?
  • What is the likely outcome for my case?

In legal practice, experience matters. An experienced attorney will likely have handled issues similar to yours many, many times. Therefore, after listening to your situation, the attorney should have a reasonable idea of the time line for a case like yours and the likely resolution.

Top Questions to Ask a Lawyer

  • What is the usual process to resolve my case? How long will it take to resolve this?
  • What are likely outcomes of a case like mine? What should I expect?

An experienced lawyer should be able to communicate a basic “road map” on how to proceed. The lawyer should be able to walk you through the anticipated process, key considerations, and potential pitfalls to avoid. Once you’ve laid out the facts of your situation to the lawyer, he/she should be able to frame expectations and likely scenarios to help you understand your legal issue.

How will an attorney charge me?

A reputable attorney will be very upfront about how he/she will charge you. The three most common fee structures that attorneys use to charge for their services are:

  • Bill by the hour
  • Contingent fee agreement
  • Flat fee agreement

Depending on your specific legal situation, it’s possible that only one type of fee structure is available. For instance, criminal defense attorneys almost always bill by the hour. In a flat fee arrangement, an attorney accepts a one-time payment to help you resolve your issue. With a contingent fee agreement, the client pays little to nothing upfront and the attorney receives a percentage of the money recovered if you win your case.

Common legal terms explained

Pro se – This Latin term refers to representing yourself in court instead of hiring professional legal counsel. Pro se representation can occur in either criminal or civil cases.

Statute – Refers to a law created by a legislative body. For example, the laws enacted by Congress are statutes.

Subject matter jurisdiction – Requirement that a particular court have authority to hear the claim based on the specific type of issue brought to the court. For example, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court only has subject matter jurisdiction over bankruptcy filings, therefore it does not have the authority to render binding judgment over other types of cases, such as divorce.

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