Top Washington, DC Federal Perjury Lawyers Near You

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

1700 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Suite 200, Washington, DC 20006

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

1001 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Suite 1300 South, Washington, DC 20004

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

2001 K St NW, Suite 400 South, Washington, DC 20006

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

101 Constitution Ave NW, Washington, DC 20001

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

1825 Eye Street, NW, Suite 900, Washington, DC 20006

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

815 Connecticut Ave., NW, Suite 400, Washington, DC 20006

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

1050 K Street NW, Suite 400, Washington, DC 20001

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

20 F Street NW, Suite 850, Washington, DC 20001

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

1050 Connecticut Ave NW, Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

2050 M Street NW, Washington, DC 20036

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

1500 K St NW, Suite 330, Washington, DC 20005

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

1325 G Street NW, Suite 500, Washington, DC 20004

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

1200 G Street, NW, Suite 800, Washington, DC 20005

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

799 9th St NW, Suite 500, Washington, DC 20001

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

600 New Hampshire Ave., NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC 20037-1931

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

717 D Street NW, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20004

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

1050 Connecticut Avenue Northwest, Suite 65041, Washington, DC 20035

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

400 5th St NW, Suite 350, Washington, DC 20001

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

444 N. Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

2001 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20006

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

1250 Connecticut Avenue NW, Suite 700, Washington, DC 20036

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

514 10th St MW, 9th Floor, Washington, DC 20004

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

1776 K Street NW, Suite 737, Washington, DC 20006

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

1001 Pennsylvania Ave NW, Suite 1300 N, Washington, DC 20004

Federal Perjury Lawyers | Washington Office

1775 Eye Street NW, Suite 1150, Washington, DC 20006

Washington Federal Perjury Information

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Find a Federal Perjury Attorney near Washington

What Is Perjury?

Perjury involves making false statements under oath in court or as part of a legal proceeding. Making false statements in a legal document can also be perjury, including signing a document under penalty of perjury if the document contains false information. The crime of perjury carries the possibility of a prison sentence and fines.

Is Perjury a Federal Offense?

Perjury can be a state criminal offense or a federal offense. Generally, false statements in state court or in a state legal proceeding can be considered perjury under state law. In a federal legal action or when signing federal documents, misstatements or lies may be considered federal perjury.

Under the federal perjury statute, perjury involves making a statement that someone does not believe to be true. For federal perjury, making an oath or declaration that is stated to be true is perjury if the person willfully and contrary to the oath or declaration believes it to be untrue. Any declaration, verification, or statement made under penalty of perjury that is not true may also be perjury.

What is Required to Prove Perjury?

In order to prove perjury, federal prosecutors have to prove every element of the offense “beyond a reasonable doubt.” If there is any doubt about any of the elements, a defendant should not be convicted of federal perjury charges. The element of perjury require proving the defendant:

  1. Was under oath during his testimony, declaration or certification;
  2. Made a material false statement; and
  3. Made the false statement with knowledge of its falsity.

A false statement has to be material to the proceedings. Material statements have a tendency to influence the case or proceeding. For example, in a federal extortion case, a witness falsely stated they were wearing black shoes instead of brown shoes, if the shoes are not an issue in the case, it may not be considered a material misstatement.

The defendant has to have the specific intent to make a false statement. Someone can give false testimony statement because of a mistake, faulty memory, or confusion without intending to lie.

Is It a Defense to Perjury if I Correct My Statement?

After making a false statement in federal courts or signing a legal document that is not true, the person who made the statement may worry that they are going to get in trouble for the perjured testimony. The person may try to go to the next court proceeding to correct the misstatement to avoid punishment. However, recanting the false declaration or trying to correct the perjured statement may not be a full defense to perjury. Instead, recantation may be used as evidence that a defendant intended to make a willfully false statement at the time.

What Is an Example of Federal Perjury?

In a burglary trial, a witness identified the suspect as the person who was seen breaking a window and climbing into the victim’s home. Someone who is friends with the suspect lies to the court under oath and claims that they were with the suspect watching a movie at the time of the break-in. Making this false statement under oath is perjury because it is a material statement to the burglary case.

In this case, the suspect could also be charged with a crime. It may be a crime to persuade someone else to commit perjury under oath. If the suspect convinced the friend to lie in court, this may be considered “subornation of perjury.”

How Is Perjury Punished?

As a federal crime, perjury is a felony offense. If you are convicted of perjury charges, the maximum sentence is imprisonment for up to 5 years. Perjury penalties may also include monetary fines. A conviction for perjury can also have further consequences, including a felony criminal record. A felony may make it more difficult to find a job or find a place to live. A conviction for perjury can also limit holding public office or pursuing certain professions.

How Can a Federal Perjury Lawyer Help?

Perjury is a serious criminal offense and a conviction has long-term consequences. After a federal criminal defense lawyer reviews your case, they may be able to identify possible legal defenses, problems with the prosecutor’s case, and provide legal advice on the best defense strategies.

There are several legal defense options for a federal defense lawyer in a perjury case. Common defenses include showing the defendant was not under oath at the time, the defendant made a mistake instead of intentionally lied, or the untrue statements were not material to the case.

A criminal defense attorney can also negotiate a plea agreement with the prosecutor. A beneficial plea bargain can help you reduce criminal penalties, avoid additional criminal charges, or get a reduced sentence, including avoiding jail time.

Top Questions to Ask When Hiring an Attorney

  • How many years have you been practicing law? How long have you practiced law in the local area?
  • How many cases similar to mine have you handled in the past?
  • What is the likely outcome for my case?

In legal practice, experience matters. An experienced attorney will likely have handled issues similar to yours many, many times. Therefore, after listening to your situation, the attorney should have a reasonable idea of the time line for a case like yours and the likely resolution.

Top Questions to Ask a Lawyer

  • What is the usual process to resolve my case? How long will it take to resolve this?
  • What are likely outcomes of a case like mine? What should I expect?

An experienced lawyer should be able to communicate a basic “road map” on how to proceed. The lawyer should be able to walk you through the anticipated process, key considerations, and potential pitfalls to avoid. Once you’ve laid out the facts of your situation to the lawyer, he/she should be able to frame expectations and likely scenarios to help you understand your legal issue.

Points to Consider Before Hiring a Lawyer

Experience. Regardless of the type of legal matter you need help with, an experienced attorney will usually be able to get you better results.

Competence. Determine an attorney’s expertise by asking about their track record for the issue you need help with resolving.

Fit. There are plenty of good attorneys out there; make sure you find one you are comfortable working with.

Common legal terms explained

Plaintiff – a person or party who brings a lawsuit against another person(s) or party/parties in a court of law. Private persons or parties can only file suit in civil court.

Judgment – A decision of the court. Also known as a decree or order. Judgments handed down by the court are usually binding on the parties before the court.

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