Top Littleton, CO Eviction Lawyers Near You

Eviction Lawyers | Denver Office | Serving Littleton, CO

1700 Lincoln Street, Suite 2400, Denver, CO 80203

Eviction Lawyers | Littleton Office

1805 Shea Center Dr, Littleton, CO 80129

Eviction Lawyers | Denver Office | Serving Littleton, CO

1775 Sherman Street, Suite 1790, Denver, CO 80203

Eviction Lawyers | Denver Office | Serving Littleton, CO

1700 Lincoln Street, Suite 4000, Denver, CO 80203

Eviction Lawyers | Denver Office | Serving Littleton, CO

7800 E Union Ave, Suite 600, Denver, CO 80237

Eviction Lawyers | Denver Office | Serving Littleton, CO

3200 Cherry Creek S. Drive, Suite 520, Denver, CO 80209

Eviction Lawyers | Denver Office | Serving Littleton, CO

600 S. Cherry Street, Suite 740, Denver, CO 80246

Eviction Lawyers | Denver Office | Serving Littleton, CO

6500 S. Quebec Street, Suite 300-32, Denver, CO 80111

Eviction Lawyers | Denver Office | Serving Littleton, CO

1400 16th Street, 16 Market Square, Suite 400, Denver, CO 80202

Eviction Lawyers | Denver Office | Serving Littleton, CO

4100 East Mississippi Avenue, Suite 1800, Denver, CO 80246

Eviction Lawyers | Highlands Ranch Office | Serving Littleton, CO

8740 Lucent Blvd, Suite 410, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129

Eviction Lawyers | Denver Office | Serving Littleton, CO

1515 Wynkoop Street, Suite 600, Denver, CO 80202

Eviction Lawyers | Denver Office | Serving Littleton, CO

1777 S. Harrison Street, Suite 1500, Denver, CO 80210

Eviction Lawyers | Denver Office | Serving Littleton, CO

1760 Gaylord Street, Denver, CO 80206

Eviction Lawyers | Denver Office | Serving Littleton, CO

1401 Lawrence St, Suite 1900, Denver, CO 80202

Eviction Lawyers | Denver Office | Serving Littleton, CO

950 17th Street, Suite 2600, Denver, CO 80202

Eviction Lawyers | Denver Office | Serving Littleton, CO

1144 15th St, Suite 3400, Denver, CO 80202

Eviction Lawyers | Wheat Ridge Office | Serving Littleton, CO

4175 Harlan Street, Suite 200, Wheat Ridge, CO 80204

Eviction Lawyers | Denver Office | Serving Littleton, CO

4643 South Ulster Street, Suite 1250, Denver, CO 80237

Eviction Lawyers | Denver Office | Serving Littleton, CO

7555 East Hampden Avenue, Suite 600, Denver, CO 80231

Eviction Lawyers | Denver Office | Serving Littleton, CO

1634 Downing St., Denver, CO 80218

Eviction Lawyers | Denver Office | Serving Littleton, CO

1225 17th Street, Suite 2750, Denver, CO 80202

Eviction Lawyers | Denver Office | Serving Littleton, CO

1675 Broadway, Suite 1850, Denver, CO 80202

Littleton Eviction Information

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Lead Counsel Verified Attorneys In Littleton

Lead Counsel independently verifies Eviction attorneys in Littleton and checks their standing with Colorado bar associations.

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Find an Eviction Attorney near Littleton

Eviction and Unlawful Detainer

To evict renters, the property owner must file an unlawful detainer with the court that documents a legitimate reason for eviction, such as nonpayment of rent, failing to vacate after proper notice, or the tenant’s violation of a drug or nuisance agreement.

Do I Need an Eviction and Unlawful Detainer Lawyer?

If you believe you are being evicted from rental property without sufficient reason, it is in your best interest to immediately consult a Littleton eviction and unlawful detainer lawyer to protect your rights and respond to the landlord within a short specified period of time. The lawyer can explain the law and determine if the landlord is acting improperly.

Are There Any Eviction Lawyers Near Me In Littleton, CO?

When you are faced with the loss of your home, nothing else seems as important. What is important is finding an experienced lawyer who knows how to protect your rights under the law. A firm understanding of eviction law and experience with your type of case is critical for a positive outcome. The LawInfo directory can help you find verified eviction lawyers near Littleton. 

How Long Does an Eviction Take?

The timeline for an eviction process can vary, but generally, it starts with a waiting period of a few weeks to a month or more that rent goes unpaid before a landlord can file a notice to quit, which puts the eviction into motion. The landlord must then file more paperwork with the court, such as a summons to notify the tenants of the impending court date. It can take a few weeks from the summons until the parties will actually appear in court. If the court grants the eviction, the tenants may get a month or so before they actually have to vacate the property. All in all, depending on the state, the process will take a couple of weeks to a few months, and can take even longer if the tenants file appeals or seek to move the case to a different court.

How Long Does an Eviction Stay on Your Record?

Evictions will typically stay on your rental history for seven years, as will any record of late payments on your credit report. Evictions will also be removed from any public records after seven years. In most cases, these changes should happen automatically and you won’t need to take any steps to fix your records.

How Long Do You Have to Move Out After Eviction?

The length of time you have before you need to move out after an eviction will vary. People who are elderly or who have certain physical or mental disabilities may get a longer timeline before they have to vacate, for example. Most people will get a few days before they have to be fully moved out. The exact timeline should be clearly explained during the eviction hearing. If you don’t move out by that time, the landlord can call the local police to come remove you, though they usually have to give you a few days notice that this physical eviction is coming.

How Does an Eviction Notice Work?

An eviction order has to come from a court in order to be valid. A landlord can’t just tell the tenant to move out or change the locks, they have to go through the right legal process. This includes giving the tenant an eviction notice that provides them with information like the reason for the eviction and if there’s anything the tenant can do to remedy the situation before it moves forward. The landlord will need to file the right forms with the court to obtain the notice. Each jurisdiction has specific rules on what a notice needs to include and how it must be delivered to the tenant for it to be legal. The tenant will then have a time limit for a proper response to the court, at which point an eviction hearing will get scheduled.

What Does Eviction Do to Your Credit?

While there are some persistent consequences to getting evicted, a specific hit to your credit report isn’t usually one of them. Evictions will show up on a rental history report, and in some cases, the overdue or unpaid rent may be reported if your landlord sold the debt to a collection agency, but there shouldn’t be a negative impact on your overall credit score because of the eviction itself. The impact on your rental record may cause complications when you go to find new housing, and the eviction order may be a matter of public record that some agencies can access, however.

When to Hire a Lawyer

It is in your best interest to get legal help early on in addressing your situation. There are times when hiring a lawyer quickly is critical to your case, such as if you are charged with a crime. It may also be in your best interest to have a lawyer review the fine print before signing legal documents. A lawyer can also help you get the compensation you deserve if you’ve suffered a serious injury. For issues where money or property is at stake, having a lawyer guide you through the complexities of the legal system can save you time, hassle, and possibly a lot of grief in the long run.

How to Prepare for Your Initial Consultation

Prepare for your consultation by writing down notes of your understanding of the case, jot down questions and concerns for the attorney, and gather your documents. Remember that you are trying to get a sense of whether the attorney has your trust and can help you address your legal issues. Questions should include how the attorney intends to resolve your issue, how many years he/she has been practicing law and specifically practicing in your area, as well as how many cases similar to yours the attorney has handled. It can also be helpful to broach the subject of fees so that you understand the likely cost and structure of your representation by a specific attorney and/or legal team.

How to Find the Right Attorney

  • Determine the area of law that relates to your issue. Attorneys specialize in specific practice areas around legal issues within the broad field of law.
  • Seek out recommendations from friends, family, and colleagues. A successful attorney or practice will typically have many satisfied clients.
  • Set up consultation appointments to get a better understanding of your case as well as gauge your comfort level with different attorneys. Find the attorney who is the right fit for your needs.

Common legal terms explained

Pro se – This Latin term refers to representing yourself in court instead of hiring professional legal counsel. Pro se representation can occur in either criminal or civil cases.

Statute – Refers to a law created by a legislative body. For example, the laws enacted by Congress are statutes.

Subject matter jurisdiction – Requirement that a particular court have authority to hear the claim based on the specific type of issue brought to the court. For example, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court only has subject matter jurisdiction over bankruptcy filings, therefore it does not have the authority to render binding judgment over other types of cases, such as divorce.

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