Top Richmond, VA Estate Planning Lawyers Near You

Estate Planning Lawyers | Richmond Office

1802 Bayberry Court, Suite 200, Richmond, VA 23226

Estate Planning Lawyers | Ashland Office | Serving Richmond, VA

201 N. Washington Highway, Suite 302, Ashland, VA 23005

Estate Planning Lawyers | Richmond Office

7231 Forest Ave., Suite 200, Richmond, VA 23226

Estate Planning Lawyers | Richmond Office

919 East Main Street, Suite 1300, Richmond, VA 23219

Estate Planning Lawyers | Richmond Office

6800 Paragon Place, Suite 626, Richmond, VA 23230

Estate Planning Lawyers | Hanover Office | Serving Richmond, VA

13224 Hanover Courthouse Rd, Suite 205, Hanover, VA 23069

Estate Planning Lawyers | Richmond Office

8401 Patterson Avenue, Suite 106, Richmond, VA 23229

Estate Planning Lawyers | Richmond Office

919 East Main Street, Suite 1130, Richmond, VA 23219

Estate Planning Lawyers | Richmond Office

2100 E. Cary Street, Richmond, VA 23223

Estate Planning Lawyers | Richmond Office

1570 Battery Hill Drive, Richmond, VA 23231

Estate Planning Lawyers | Richmond Office

1001 Haxall Point, Richmond, VA 23219

Estate Planning Lawyers | Richmond Office

8550 Mayland Drive, Richmond, VA 23294

Estate Planning Lawyers | Richmond Office

7401 Beaufont Springs Drive, Boulders VI, Suite 200, Richmond, VA 23225

Estate Planning Lawyers | Richmond Office

8550 Mayland Drive, Suite 100, Richmond, VA 23294

Estate Planning Lawyers | Midlothian Office | Serving Richmond, VA

15871 City View Drive, Suite 220, Midlothian, VA 23113

Estate Planning Lawyers | Richmond Office

6800 Paragon Place, Suite 233, Richmond, VA 23230

Estate Planning Lawyers | Richmond Office

311 South Boulevard, 3rd Floor, Richmond, VA 23220

Estate Planning Lawyers | Richmond Office

3463 W. Cary Street, Richmond, VA 23221

Estate Planning Lawyers | Richmond Office

7275 Glen Forest Drive, Suite 310, Richmond, VA 23226

Estate Planning Lawyers | Richmond Office

10610 Cloister Dr, Richmond, VA 23238

Estate Planning Lawyers | Richmond Office

6802 Paragon Place, Suite 100, Richmond, VA 23230

Estate Planning Lawyers | Richmond Office

PO Box 29349, Richmond, VA 23242

Estate Planning Lawyers | Richmond Office

3957 Westerre Parkway, Suite 105, Richmond, VA 23233

Richmond Estate Planning Information

Lead Counsel Badge

Lead Counsel Verified Attorneys In Richmond

Lead Counsel independently verifies Estate Planning attorneys in Richmond and checks their standing with Virginia bar associations.

Our Verification Process and Criteria
  • Ample Experience Attorneys must meet stringent qualifications and prove they practice in the area of law they’re verified in.
  • Good Standing Be in good standing with their bar associations and maintain a clean disciplinary record.
  • Annual Review Submit to an annual review to retain their Lead Counsel Verified status.
  • Client Commitment Pledge to follow the highest quality client service and ethical standards.

Find an Estate Planning Attorney near Richmond

Help with Estate Planning

Hiring a Richmond Estate Planning Attorney is the best way to know you’ve adequately prepared for you and your family’s future. Additionally, depending on what you wish to achieve, an estate plan can help support family members, charities, and other worthy causes.

Estate Planning Attorneys

All individuals, regardless of their financial position, will benefit from talking with an Estate Planning Lawyer. However, speaking with a lawyer can be very useful when a person suddenly comes into a lot of money, such as from inheritance or a business sale.

A proper estate plan typically utilizes both a trust and a will. These two powerful tools allow you to make sure not only that your financial goals are addressed, but that you have peace of mind knowing those you love will be taken care of properly when you’re no longer able or willing to do so.

What is estate planning?

Estate planning is the process through which you make known your wishes for what you want to happen to your assets upon your death (commonly done through a last will and testament). Estate planning also involves stating your wishes for your health care through power of attorney declarations and advanced directives. In short, it allows you to maintain control of your health care and estate.

How much does estate planning cost?

There are do-it-yourself documents available online that allow you to create your own will, advance directive, and power of attorney declaration. Going this route will be cheaper than using an attorney in the present. However, it is good to work on an estate plan with your attorney to ensure you are going through the process correctly and addressing details you haven’t thought of. If you are worried about cost, you can discuss that with attorneys at your initial consultations as you shop around.

What estate planning documents do you need?

Every estate plan should include a last will and testament or establish a trust. This will allow you to state how you wish to distribute your assets to beneficiaries upon your death. A power of attorney declaration will name someone you trust to handle your health care and/or financial decisions if you are ever unable to. An advanced directive (also known as a living will) will state your wishes for any care you want to receive if you are unable to make those decisions at the time. This is useful when it comes to end-of-life care or if you ever need life-saving care because of an accident or illness.

Who needs estate planning?

Everyone needs estate planning, and if you are 18, it is never too early to start thinking about your plan! While we all want to live a long, full life, accidents and illnesses happen. And having a plan in place will go a long way in protecting your wishes.

When to Hire a Lawyer

It is in your best interest to get legal help early on in addressing your situation. There are times when hiring a lawyer quickly is critical to your case, such as if you are charged with a crime. It may also be in your best interest to have a lawyer review the fine print before signing legal documents. A lawyer can also help you get the compensation you deserve if you’ve suffered a serious injury. For issues where money or property is at stake, having a lawyer guide you through the complexities of the legal system can save you time, hassle, and possibly a lot of grief in the long run.

The Importance of a Good Consultation

The goal of an initial consultation is to find an attorney you are comfortable working with and someone who can help you understand your options under the law. Seek to understand the relevant legal experience the attorney brings to your case. While it is not realistic to expect an attorney to resolve your legal issue during an initial consultation, you should gain a level of comfort with his/her ability to do so. A good consultation can clarify issues, raise pertinent questions and considerations for your case, and help you make an informed decision towards resolving your legal issue.

How will an attorney charge me?

A reputable attorney will be very upfront about how he/she will charge you. The three most common fee structures that attorneys use to charge for their services are:

  • Bill by the hour
  • Contingent fee agreement
  • Flat fee agreement

Depending on your specific legal situation, it’s possible that only one type of fee structure is available. For instance, criminal defense attorneys almost always bill by the hour. In a flat fee arrangement, an attorney accepts a one-time payment to help you resolve your issue. With a contingent fee agreement, the client pays little to nothing upfront and the attorney receives a percentage of the money recovered if you win your case.

Common legal terms explained

Pro se – This Latin term refers to representing yourself in court instead of hiring professional legal counsel. Pro se representation can occur in either criminal or civil cases.

Statute – Refers to a law created by a legislative body. For example, the laws enacted by Congress are statutes.

Subject matter jurisdiction – Requirement that a particular court have authority to hear the claim based on the specific type of issue brought to the court. For example, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court only has subject matter jurisdiction over bankruptcy filings, therefore it does not have the authority to render binding judgment over other types of cases, such as divorce.

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