Top Theodore, AL Drug Crime Lawyers Near You

Drug Crime Lawyers | Mobile Office | Serving Theodore, AL

501 Church St., Mobile, AL 36601

Drug Crime Lawyers | Mobile Office | Serving Theodore, AL

1 St. Louis Street, Suite 1000, Mobile, AL 36602

Drug Crime Lawyers | Mobile Office | Serving Theodore, AL

10015 Turtle Creek Lane S, Mobile, AL 36695

Drug Crime Lawyers | Mobile Office | Serving Theodore, AL

207 Church Street, PO Box 2705, Mobile, AL 36652-2705

Drug Crime Lawyers | Mobile Office | Serving Theodore, AL

1706 Dauphin Street, Mobile, AL 36604

Drug Crime Lawyers | Mobile Office | Serving Theodore, AL

205 Church Street, PO Box 43, Mobile, AL 36601-0043

Drug Crime Lawyers | Mobile Office | Serving Theodore, AL

509 Church Street, Mobile, AL 36602

Drug Crime Lawyers | Mobile Office | Serving Theodore, AL

1111 Dauphin St, Mobile, AL 36604

Drug Crime Lawyers | Foley Office | Serving Theodore, AL

307 S. McKenzie St., PO Box 1965, Foley, AL 36536

Drug Crime Lawyers | Mobile Office | Serving Theodore, AL

118 N Royal St, Suite 404, Mobile, AL 36602

Drug Crime Lawyers | Daphne Office | Serving Theodore, AL

26148 Capital Dr, Suite D, Daphne, AL 36526

Drug Crime Lawyers | Summerdale Office | Serving Theodore, AL

109 N.W. 1st St., PO Box 10, Summerdale, AL 36580

Drug Crime Lawyers | Fairhope Office | Serving Theodore, AL

221 Fairhope Avenue, PO Box 1367, Fairhope, AL 36533-1367

Drug Crime Lawyers | Mobile Office | Serving Theodore, AL

163 St. Emmanuel St South, Mobile, AL 36602

Drug Crime Lawyers | Mobile Office | Serving Theodore, AL

11 North Water St, Suite 1200, Mobile, AL 36602

Drug Crime Lawyers | Fairhope Office | Serving Theodore, AL

21 South Section Street, Fairhope, AL 36532

Drug Crime Lawyers | Mobile Office | Serving Theodore, AL

208 Adams St., Mobile, AL 36633

Drug Crime Lawyers | Magnolia Springs Office | Serving Theodore, AL

14347 Oak Street, Magnolia Springs, AL 36555

Drug Crime Lawyers | Mobile Office | Serving Theodore, AL

11 North Water Street, RSA Tower, Suite 22200, Mobile, AL 36602

Drug Crime Lawyers | Gulf Shores Office | Serving Theodore, AL

8975 Pompano Way, Gulf Shores, AL 36542

Theodore Drug Crime Information

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Find a Drug Crime Attorney near Theodore

What are some examples of drug-related crimes?

Drug crimes involve any actions related to the use of local, state, or federally banned narcotics like heroin, cocaine, marijuana, and methamphetamine. Some common drug crimes include selling, distributing, consuming, or possessing these substances. The illegal use of prescription drugs like oxycodone and Vicodin also falls under this category. For example, if you police find you with oxycodone, but you do not have a prescription for it, you are likely to be arrested.

What Is Considered a Drug Crime?

Drug crimes are some of the most common crimes in the United States, ranging from (unlawful) possession of a controlled substance to large-scale drug trafficking and racketeering. Drug crime typically involves the possession, distribution, manufacture, cultivation, or illicit sale of recreational drugs, from morphine to heroin to cannabis.

How are drug abuse and drug crimes linked?

While many city governments and law enforcement agencies are placing less emphasis on arresting people possessing small amounts of drugs, if you are caught buying drugs and police are targeting a dealer, you could also face arrest. However, many courts are also offering alternative sentencing options for people struggling with addiction who want to get clean.

What Makes a Drug Crime a Federal Crime?

Nearly any drug offense could see you end up in the federal system because these substances are all banned under federal law. If federal officers, such as those with the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), are conducting operations in your area, an arrest by one of those officers would likely lead to federal charges. Using illegal drugs on federal property, such as national parks, can also lead to drug charges. While federal officials often target distributors and traffickers more than people possessing a small amount of drugs, the potential does still exist.

What makes a drug crime a federal crime?

Nearly any drug offense could see you end up in the federal system because these substances are all banned under federal law. If federal officers, such as those with the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), are conducting operations in your area, an arrest by one of those officers would likely lead to federal charges. Using illegal drugs on federal property, such as national parks, can also lead to drug charges. While federal officials often target distributors and traffickers more than people possessing a small amount of drugs, the potential does still exist.

What Are Some Examples of Drug-Related Crimes?

Drug crimes involve any actions related to the use of local, state or federally banned narcotics like heroin, cocaine, marijuana and methamphetamine. Some common drug crimes include selling, distributing, consuming or possessing these substances. The illegal use of prescription drugs like oxycodone and Vicodin also falls under this category. For example, if police find you with oxycodone, but you do not have a prescription for it, you are likely to be arrested.

The most common drug crime in the U.S. is drug possession. Having one or more illegal drugs on one’s person constitutes the crime, whether an offender is under the influence of said drugs. Some states consider possession of small amounts of marijuana to be a petty offense or infraction if they prosecute it at all. This leniency in the face of increasingly common relaxation of laws regarding cannabis consumption does not apply to most other drugs scheduled by the federal government.

Drug possession with intent to distribute (or simply possession with intent to distribute) is a charge which straddles the gap between simple possession (of small amounts, personal amounts of a controlled substance) and drug trafficking (which involves the large-scale movement/dealing of illicit drugs). A “street dealer” moving moderate quantities of cocaine, crack, methamphetamine, etc. may be charged with drug possession with intent to distribute if a case can be made based on the evidence provided by law enforcement.

Drug trafficking is the highest order of drug offenses, at both the state and federal levels. Almost always classified as a felony, drug trafficking refers to conducting unlawful trade in controlled substances, generally involving great quantities of the drug(s) in question.

What Are the Penalties for Different Drug Crimes?

While simple possession of most scheduled drugs (particularly cannabis) results in, at most, misdemeanor charges — and typically, a drug diversion program or rehabilitation — possession with intent to distribute and drug trafficking are prosecuted more aggressively.

Those convicted of large-scale drug trafficking could see between 10 years to a life sentence if convicted. At the state level, drug trafficking charges typically range from three years to a life sentence, depending on the drug being moved and the quantity being transported. If death or serious injury results from the trafficking of these drugs or the demonstrable use of the drugs, penalties are almost always enhanced to 20 years to life.

Possession with intent to distribute is generally charged at the state level, and penalties vary based on the context of the crime as well as the jurisdiction laws of each state. In some states, possession of cannabis with intent to sell is classified as a third degree felony. If found guilty of these charges, offenders could face up to five years behind bars. If the substance in question is instead cocaine, the maximum sentence is increased to 15 years incarceration. A range of between one to five years is common for first-time offenders, with penalties increasing for repeat offenders or for more harshly scrutinized drugs.

Can I Get Probation for a Drug Crime in Alabama?

You can be handed a probation requirement in response to a conviction for a drug-related crime or even as part of a potential plea deal. The likelihood that you receive probation as part of your sentence depends on the severity of the alleged offense and a variety of other factors, so it is vital to speak with an attorney to determine if you can reasonably expect to get probation. Regularly meeting with your probation officer, abstaining from drugs or with those who use drugs, and other conditions may be part of your probation.

Do I Need a Lawyer for a Drug Crime?

If you are facing charges related to drugs or drug-related crime, you should seek the services of a skilled criminal defense attorney at your earliest opportunity. A conviction in response to a drug crime, even simple possession, can create a lifelong disadvantage in the form of a permanent criminal record.

Retaining proper legal counsel not only increases your chance of avoiding conviction, but in situations where the prosecution has a viable case, your attorney may be able to negotiate a lesser sentence in exchange for your cooperation. Together, you and your lawyer can craft the best defense possible in the event that you decide to proceed to trial, and if not, your lawyer can help to guide you through every option available to you.

Best Time to Seek Legal Help

No matter what your legal issue may be, it is always best to seek legal help early in the process. An attorney can help secure what is likely to be the best possible outcome for your situation and avoid both unnecessary complications or errors.

Tips on Approaching an Initial Attorney Consultation

  • Use the consultation as a means of gaining a better understanding of your legal situation.
  • Ask the attorney how many cases similar to yours he/she has handled. An attorney’s experience and knowledge can speak to their expertise (or lack of) in addressing your situation.
  • Your attorney should be able to articulate roughly how long a case like yours will take to resolve and what sort of procedures to expect.
  • Determine how comfortable you are working with the lawyer and/or law firm.

Points to Consider Before Hiring a Lawyer

Experience. Regardless of the type of legal matter you need help with, an experienced attorney will usually be able to get you better results.

Competence. Determine an attorney’s expertise by asking about their track record for the issue you need help with resolving.

Fit. There are plenty of good attorneys out there; make sure you find one you are comfortable working with.

Common legal terms explained

Pro se – This Latin term refers to representing yourself in court instead of hiring professional legal counsel. Pro se representation can occur in either criminal or civil cases.

Statute – Refers to a law created by a legislative body. For example, the laws enacted by Congress are statutes.

Subject matter jurisdiction – Requirement that a particular court have authority to hear the claim based on the specific type of issue brought to the court. For example, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court only has subject matter jurisdiction over bankruptcy filings, therefore it does not have the authority to render binding judgment over other types of cases, such as divorce.

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