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Top New Orleans, LA Disturbing the Peace Lawyers Near You

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | New Orleans Office

400 Poydras St, Suite 1990, New Orleans, LA 70130

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Metairie Office | Serving New Orleans, LA

3850 N. Causeway Blvd, Suite 1500, Metairie, LA 70002

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Kenner Office | Serving New Orleans, LA

3309 Williams Blvd, Kenner, LA 70065

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Gretna Office | Serving New Orleans, LA

505 Weyer St, Gretna, LA 70053-6031

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | New Orleans Office

700 Camp Street, Suite 216, New Orleans, LA 70130

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | New Orleans Office

400 Poydras St, Suite 2400, New Orleans, LA 70130

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | New Orleans Office

336 Lafayette St., Suite 301, New Orleans, LA 70130

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | New Orleans Office

201 Saint Charles Ave, Suite 2411, New Orleans, LA 70170

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | New Orleans Office

3015 Magazine St, New Orleans, LA 70115

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | New Orleans Office

1100 Poydras Street, Suite 2950, New Orleans, LA 70163

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | New Orleans Office

3900 Canal St, New Orleans, LA 70119

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Slidell Office | Serving New Orleans, LA

2217 2nd Street, Slidell, LA 70458-3611

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | New Orleans Office

4907 Magazine St., New Orleans, LA 70115

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | New Orleans Office

700 Camp Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | New Orleans Office

631 Saint Charles Ave, New Orleans, LA 70130

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Slidell Office | Serving New Orleans, LA

204 Village Cir, Suite 3, Slidell, LA 70458

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | New Orleans Office

201 St. Charles Ave, Suite 2700, New Orleans, LA 70170

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | New Orleans Office

1055 St. Charles Ave, Suite 208, New Orleans, LA 70130

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Metairie Office | Serving New Orleans, LA

3333 W. Napoleon Avenue, Suite 101, Metairie, LA 70001

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | New Orleans Office

1100 Poydras St., Suite 2990, New Orleans, LA 70163

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Harvey Office | Serving New Orleans, LA

1901 Manhattan Blvd, Bldg D, Harvey, LA 70058

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Gretna Office | Serving New Orleans, LA

320 Huey P Long Ave, Gretna, LA 70054-5905

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Metairie Office | Serving New Orleans, LA

1 Galleria Blvd., Suite 1502, Metairie, LA 70001

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Metairie Office | Serving New Orleans, LA

2821 Kingman St, Suite C, PO Box 491, Metairie, LA 70004

New Orleans Disturbing the Peace Information

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Find a Disturbing the Peace Attorney near New Orleans

What Is Considered Disturbing the Peace?

Disturbing the peace occurs when a person or group causes excessive continued noise that disturbs or endangers the peace and safety of others. The noise can be caused by almost anything. It is most often a minor criminal offense and can result in a criminal record.

Disturbing the peace is a misdemeanor offense, largely prosecuted at the local or the state level, in which an offender breached or disturbs the public peace.

This disturbance can come by way of fighting or brawling in public, obstinately interfering with business operations, screaming or shouting relentlessly in a public area, becoming overly raucous or rambunctious to the point of disturbance or any other variety of factors. Given that disturbance of the peace is a broad charge with many different names and behaviors associated with it (breach of the peace, for example), it is difficult to strictly categorize.

Disorderly Conduct vs. Disturbing the Peace

While both acts are generally committed in public, disorderly conduct and disturbing the peace are generally similar, both being considered misdemeanors as a result of unlawful and unwanted public behaviors.

While disturbing the peace is a broad charge, disorderly conduct is even broader. Squatting unlawfully in a tenement or apartment, prostitution or solicitation of prostitution (in certain jurisdictions) and begging or panhandling can be considered disorderly conduct. While disturbing the peace charges hinge more commonly around the idea of actually causing a public excitement or scene as a result of the offender’s actions, disorderly conduct does not always have this element.

What Is the Punishment for a Disturbing the Peace Charge?

Given that disturbing the peace is a misdemeanor rather than a felony in almost all instances, the typical penalty for those found guilty could be a jail term of 30 days to six months, and fines ranging from $200 to $1,000 or damages caused as a result of the offense. A probationary period, community service, addictions counseling or other considerations may be added to the sentence at the discretion of the court.

Some states classify disorderly conduct and disturbing the peace as similar enough to fall under the same umbrella of a second-degree misdemeanor. Those found guilty of these sorts of offenses could face up to six months behind bars in addition to a potential $500 fine.

By contrast, some states consider disturbing the peace to fall under the broader category of disorderly conduct as well. Disorderly conduct is considered a violation, rather than a criminal act (misdemeanor or no), and the maximum penalty is 15 days in jail as well as a small fine.

Can I Go to Jail for Disturbing the Peace?

In most jurisdictions, you can be sentenced to a jail term of between 14 days to six months in response to a conviction for disturbance of the peace or disorderly conduct.

Do I Need a Lawyer for Disturbing the Peace Charges in New Orleans?

If you are facing charges related to any disturbance of the peace or disorderly conduct offenses, it is highly recommended that you retain legal counsel at your earliest opportunity.

A skilled criminal defense attorney familiar with such charges can consult with you to determine the best path forward, perhaps negotiating with prosecutors to avoid trial entirely.

Despite the fact that some jurisdictions do not consider disturbance of the peace or disorderly conduct to be criminal matters — therefore excluding the possibility of a criminal record if you are found guilty — many jurisdictions do. Even in states where the matter is considered a violation rather than a misdemeanor, you could still be facing a short period in jail as well as punitive fines if you are found guilty. An experienced attorney can make sure that all options are presented to you with professionalism and care, improving your odds of making an informed and well-founded decision as to how best to proceed with your case.

Disturbing the Peace Legal Help

If you are charged with this offense, do not hesitate to contact a disturbing the peace lawyer. This applicable law varies between jurisdictions and prosecutors and judges may be tough or lenient. The lawyer will know how authorities handle these cases in your area, evaluate the circumstances and develop your defense.

How an Attorney Can Help

An attorney can often resolve your particular legal issue faster and better than trying to do it alone. A lawyer can help you navigate the legal system, while avoiding costly mistakes or procedural errors. You should seek out an attorney whose practice focuses on the area of law most relevant to your issue.

How to Prepare for Your Initial Consultation

Prepare for your consultation by writing down notes of your understanding of the case, jot down questions and concerns for the attorney, and gather your documents. Remember that you are trying to get a sense of whether the attorney has your trust and can help you address your legal issues. Questions should include how the attorney intends to resolve your issue, how many years he/she has been practicing law and specifically practicing in your area, as well as how many cases similar to yours the attorney has handled. It can also be helpful to broach the subject of fees so that you understand the likely cost and structure of your representation by a specific attorney and/or legal team.

Types of legal fees:

Bill by the hour: Many attorneys bill by the hour. How much an attorney bills you per hour will vary based on a number of factors. For instance, an attorney’s hourly fee may fluctuate based on whether that hour is spent representing you in court or doing research on your case. Attorneys in one practice area may bill you more than attorneys in a different practice area.

Contingent fee: Some lawyers will accept payment via contingent fee. In this arrangement, the lawyer receives a percentage of the total monetary recovery if you win your lawsuit. In sum, the lawyer only gets paid if you win. Contingent fee agreements are limited to specific practice areas in civil law.

Flat fee: For “routine” legal work where the attorney generally knows the amount of time and resources necessary to complete the task, he/she may be willing to bill you a flat fee for services performed.

Common legal terms explained

Affidavit – A sworn written statement made under oath. An affidavit is meant to be a supporting document to the court assisting in the verification of certain facts. An affidavit may or may not require notarization.

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