Top Mc Calla, AL Disturbing the Peace Lawyers Near You

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

2311 Highland Ave S., Suite 330, Birmingham, AL 35205

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

420 20th Street North, Suite 1400, Birmingham, AL 35203-5202

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Hoover Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

101 Riverchase Parkway East, Hoover, AL 35244

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

800 Shades Creek Pkwy, Suite 870, Birmingham, AL 35209

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

2107 5th Ave N., Suite 301, Birmingham, AL 35203

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

505 North 20th Street, Suite 825, Birmingham, AL 35203

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

500 Office Park Drive, Suite 100, Birmingham, AL 35223

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

2205 Morris Avenue, Birmingham, AL 35203

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

2 Perimeter Park S, Ste 370E, Birmingham, AL 35243

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

2001 Park Place, Suite 1300, Birmingham, AL 35203

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

1929 3rd Ave N, Suite 500, Birmingham, AL 35203

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

2311 Highland Avenue South, Suite 500, Birmingham, AL 35205

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Leeds Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

8020 Parkway Drive, PO Box 521, Leeds, AL 35094

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Columbiana Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

106 N Main St, Columbiana, AL 35051

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

2100 SouthBridge Parkway, Suite 650, Birmingham, AL 35209

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

2001 Park Place North, Suite 870, Birmingham, AL 35203

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

2323 Second Avenue North, Birmingham, AL 35203

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

100 Corporate Pkwy, One Lake Level, Birmingham, AL 35242

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

PO Box 131131, Birmingham, AL 35213

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Clanton Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

207 6th St N, Suite 4, Clanton, AL 35045

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

1820 7th Ave N, Suite 105, Birmingham, AL 35203

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Columbiana Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

PO Box 278, Columbiana, AL 35051

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

2101 6th Ave N, Ste 1100, Birmingham, AL 35203

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

1665 28th Avenue South, Birmingham, AL 35209

Disturbing the Peace Lawyers | Birmingham Office | Serving Mc Calla, AL

PO Box 59767, Birmingham, AL 35259

Mc Calla Disturbing the Peace Information

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Find a Disturbing the Peace Attorney near Mc Calla

What Is Considered Disturbing the Peace?

Disturbing the peace occurs when a person or group causes excessive continued noise that disturbs or endangers the peace and safety of others. The noise can be caused by almost anything. It is most often a minor criminal offense and can result in a criminal record.

Disturbing the peace is a misdemeanor offense, largely prosecuted at the local or the state level, in which an offender breached or disturbs the public peace.

This disturbance can come by way of fighting or brawling in public, obstinately interfering with business operations, screaming or shouting relentlessly in a public area, becoming overly raucous or rambunctious to the point of disturbance or any other variety of factors. Given that disturbance of the peace is a broad charge with many different names and behaviors associated with it (breach of the peace, for example), it is difficult to strictly categorize.

Disorderly Conduct vs. Disturbing the Peace

While both acts are generally committed in public, disorderly conduct and disturbing the peace are generally similar, both being considered misdemeanors as a result of unlawful and unwanted public behaviors.

While disturbing the peace is a broad charge, disorderly conduct is even broader. Squatting unlawfully in a tenement or apartment, prostitution or solicitation of prostitution (in certain jurisdictions) and begging or panhandling can be considered disorderly conduct. While disturbing the peace charges hinge more commonly around the idea of actually causing a public excitement or scene as a result of the offender’s actions, disorderly conduct does not always have this element.

What Is the Punishment for a Disturbing the Peace Charge?

Given that disturbing the peace is a misdemeanor rather than a felony in almost all instances, the typical penalty for those found guilty could be a jail term of 30 days to six months, and fines ranging from $200 to $1,000 or damages caused as a result of the offense. A probationary period, community service, addictions counseling or other considerations may be added to the sentence at the discretion of the court.

Some states classify disorderly conduct and disturbing the peace as similar enough to fall under the same umbrella of a second-degree misdemeanor. Those found guilty of these sorts of offenses could face up to six months behind bars in addition to a potential $500 fine.

By contrast, some states consider disturbing the peace to fall under the broader category of disorderly conduct as well. Disorderly conduct is considered a violation, rather than a criminal act (misdemeanor or no), and the maximum penalty is 15 days in jail as well as a small fine.

Can I Go to Jail for Disturbing the Peace?

In most jurisdictions, you can be sentenced to a jail term of between 14 days to six months in response to a conviction for disturbance of the peace or disorderly conduct.

Do I Need a Lawyer for Disturbing the Peace Charges in Mc Calla?

If you are facing charges related to any disturbance of the peace or disorderly conduct offenses, it is highly recommended that you retain legal counsel at your earliest opportunity.

A skilled criminal defense attorney familiar with such charges can consult with you to determine the best path forward, perhaps negotiating with prosecutors to avoid trial entirely.

Despite the fact that some jurisdictions do not consider disturbance of the peace or disorderly conduct to be criminal matters — therefore excluding the possibility of a criminal record if you are found guilty — many jurisdictions do. Even in states where the matter is considered a violation rather than a misdemeanor, you could still be facing a short period in jail as well as punitive fines if you are found guilty. An experienced attorney can make sure that all options are presented to you with professionalism and care, improving your odds of making an informed and well-founded decision as to how best to proceed with your case.

Disturbing the Peace Legal Help

If you are charged with this offense, do not hesitate to contact a disturbing the peace lawyer. This applicable law varies between jurisdictions and prosecutors and judges may be tough or lenient. The lawyer will know how authorities handle these cases in your area, evaluate the circumstances and develop your defense.

When to Hire a Lawyer

It is in your best interest to get legal help early on in addressing your situation. There are times when hiring a lawyer quickly is critical to your case, such as if you are charged with a crime. It may also be in your best interest to have a lawyer review the fine print before signing legal documents. A lawyer can also help you get the compensation you deserve if you’ve suffered a serious injury. For issues where money or property is at stake, having a lawyer guide you through the complexities of the legal system can save you time, hassle, and possibly a lot of grief in the long run.

How to Prepare for Your Initial Consultation

Prepare for your consultation by writing down notes of your understanding of the case, jot down questions and concerns for the attorney, and gather your documents. Remember that you are trying to get a sense of whether the attorney has your trust and can help you address your legal issues. Questions should include how the attorney intends to resolve your issue, how many years he/she has been practicing law and specifically practicing in your area, as well as how many cases similar to yours the attorney has handled. It can also be helpful to broach the subject of fees so that you understand the likely cost and structure of your representation by a specific attorney and/or legal team.

Does firm size matter?

For most consumer legal issues, the size of the practice is much less important than the experience, competence, and reputation of the attorney(s) handling your case. Among the most important factors when choosing an attorney are your comfort level with the attorney or practice and the attorney’s track record in bringing about quick, successful resolutions to cases similar to yours.

Common legal terms explained

Pro se – This Latin term refers to representing yourself in court instead of hiring professional legal counsel. Pro se representation can occur in either criminal or civil cases.

Statute – Refers to a law created by a legislative body. For example, the laws enacted by Congress are statutes.

Subject matter jurisdiction – Requirement that a particular court have authority to hear the claim based on the specific type of issue brought to the court. For example, the U.S. Bankruptcy Court only has subject matter jurisdiction over bankruptcy filings, therefore it does not have the authority to render binding judgment over other types of cases, such as divorce.

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