Top Waianae, HI Credit Card Fraud Lawyers Near You

Credit Card Fraud Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waianae, HI

1088 Bishop St, Suite 4100, Honolulu, HI 96813

Credit Card Fraud Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waianae, HI

Tissue Genesis Tower, 810 Richards Street, Suite 335, Honolulu, HI 96813-2902

Credit Card Fraud Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waianae, HI

500 Ala Moana Boulevard, Five Waterfront Plaza, 4th Floor, Honolulu, HI 96813

Credit Card Fraud Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waianae, HI

Queen's Court, 800 Bethel Street, Suite 600, Honolulu, HI 96813

Credit Card Fraud Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waianae, HI

1001 Bishop St, Suite 1180, Honolulu, HI 96813

Credit Card Fraud Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waianae, HI

1001 Bishop Street, Suite 1800, Honolulu, HI 96813

Credit Card Fraud Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waianae, HI

915 Fort Street Mall, Suite 601, Honolulu, HI 96813

Credit Card Fraud Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waianae, HI

Davies Pacific Center, 841 Bishop St., Suite 410, Honolulu, HI 96813

Credit Card Fraud Lawyers | Honolulu Office | Serving Waianae, HI

705 S. King St., Suite 108, Honolulu, HI 96813

Waianae Credit Card Fraud Information

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Lead Counsel independently verifies Credit Card Fraud attorneys in Waianae and checks their standing with Hawaii bar associations.

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Find a Credit Card Fraud Attorney near Waianae

The Average Total Federal Prison Sentence for Credit Card Fraud in Hawaii

37.57 months*

* based on 2019 Individual Offenders - Federal Court sentencing in Hawaii federal courts. See Sentencing Data Information for complete details.

What Is Credit Card Fraud?

Credit card fraud is an offense that takes place when the offender, without the consent of the legitimate cardholder, uses their credit card or credit card details to make illegitimate purchases or withdraw money from the legitimate cardholder’s account.

Credit card fraud is a form of identity theft and is a crime at both the state and federal levels.

What Are Some Common Types of Credit Card Fraud?

Credit card fraud takes many forms. For example, simply stealing the physical card of the legitimate cardholder and then using the card to make fraudulent in-person or online transactions for the offender’s own benefit qualifies.

Likewise, skimming credit cards at a point-of-sale also constitutes credit card fraud. A dishonest gas station employee who skims the credit card of a legitimate cardholder paying for their bill, then later uses that skimmed data (either selling it on the dark web or by using it directly) is also guilty of credit card fraud.

The prevalence of card chips in contemporary credit cards (and readers that allow would-be criminals to steal data merely by being within range) has led to a prevalence in interest in protecting physical credit card credentials. Chip-blocking shields or sleeves have become standard in many households, with banking institutions joining the trend of issuing sleeves to their clients.

Can You Go to Jail for Credit Card Fraud in Hawaii?

Yes. Credit card fraud is a serious crime and those convicted of charges related to credit card fraud whether in federal or state court could be sentenced to a lengthy jail term, depending on the circumstances surrounding the offense and the total damages incurred by the criminal act in question.

What Is the Punishment for Credit Card Fraud?

If found guilty of credit card fraud at the federal level, you could face the maximum penalty is up to 10 years imprisonment in addition to a potential fine of no more than $10,000 per charge. Some types of credit card fraud involving unauthorized use of certain access devices, or telemarketing scams, are included. In these instances, the maximum penalty is escalated to up to 20 years imprisonment.

State-level statutes vary in how they treat credit card fraud, with some bundling the offense in with other white-collar criminal fraud offenses. The penalty for misdemeanor fraud/credit card fraud (sometimes defined as petty theft) typically ranges from six months to one year in county jail, with restitution and fines according to the value stolen or misappropriated.

The penalty for felony credit card fraud (typically defined as fraud over $400, or grand theft) could result in up to five years jail time, with a sentencing range of one to three years.

Do I Need a Credit Card Fraud Lawyer?

If you are facing charges related to credit card fraud, it is highly advised that you retain experienced legal counsel immediately. Without the guidance and legal expertise of a skilled attorney, your chances of being convicted increase significantly, and likewise, your chances of acquiring an acquittal drop substantially.

Given the complexity of most fraud cases, it is strongly recommended that you speak to an attorney specifically focused on criminal defense cases.

How Can a Lawyer Help With Credit Card Fraud Charges?

While attorney-client privilege affords you the right to speak and strategize with your lawyer, it also affords you the benefit of being able to figure out potential pitfalls for your case well in advance.

A skilled criminal defense attorney might deploy any number of common, effective defenses against credit card fraud charges if your case goes to trial. The prosecution will need to prove intent, and that you acted with intent to defraud a legitimate cardholder (or cardholders) during the proceedings, and this can be a high bar to clear.

A good defense attorney will be able to cast doubt on these accusations, barring the presence of strong material evidence, and may also invoke other defensive options. Arguing that you mistakenly confused an individual’s card with your own, that you were forced into a fraudulent activity via threat or duress and other legal defenses may be possible.

How an Attorney Can Help

An attorney can often resolve your particular legal issue faster and better than trying to do it alone. A lawyer can help you navigate the legal system, while avoiding costly mistakes or procedural errors. You should seek out an attorney whose practice focuses on the area of law most relevant to your issue.

The Importance of a Good Consultation

The goal of an initial consultation is to find an attorney you are comfortable working with and someone who can help you understand your options under the law. Seek to understand the relevant legal experience the attorney brings to your case. While it is not realistic to expect an attorney to resolve your legal issue during an initial consultation, you should gain a level of comfort with his/her ability to do so. A good consultation can clarify issues, raise pertinent questions and considerations for your case, and help you make an informed decision towards resolving your legal issue.

How to Find the Right Attorney

  • Determine the area of law that relates to your issue. Attorneys specialize in specific practice areas around legal issues within the broad field of law.
  • Seek out recommendations from friends, family, and colleagues. A successful attorney or practice will typically have many satisfied clients.
  • Set up consultation appointments to get a better understanding of your case as well as gauge your comfort level with different attorneys. Find the attorney who is the right fit for your needs.

Common legal terms explained

Affidavit – A sworn written statement made under oath. An affidavit is meant to be a supporting document to the court assisting in the verification of certain facts. An affidavit may or may not require notarization.

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