Top Hampton, NH CPS Lawyers Near You

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Hampton CPS Information

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Lead Counsel Verified Attorneys In Hampton

Lead Counsel independently verifies CPS attorneys in Hampton by conferring with New Hampshire bar associations and conducting annual reviews to confirm that an attorney practices in their advertised practice areas and possesses a valid bar license for the appropriate jurisdictions.

Find a Hampton CPS Attorney in your area

Klumpke's Palsy

Klumpke's Palsy is a weakness or paralysis caused by injury to the lower area of the brachial plexus. Symptoms include fingers that cannot move and a limp wrist and hand. The injury may be caused during birth by the negligence of medical staff.

Does Your Child Have Klumpke's Palsy?

If your suspect your child suffers from Klumpke's Palsy it you should immediately consult a Hampton medical malpractice lawyer. The lawyer can review the circumstances of the injury and determine if you have a valid case. If so, the lawyer can prepare your claim. Often, a settlement may be reached in medical malpractice cases to avoid an expensive court battle.

Are There Any CPS Lawyers Near Me In Hampton, NH?

The possibility of losing your children is more than many parents can bear. Getting the representation you deserve to protect your rights is never more important than when you are faced with a CPS case. You have rights under the law and an experienced CPS attorney will help you navigate the system to work toward a positive outcome for everyone. The LawInfo directory can assist you in finding a verified CPS lawyer in Hampton.

What Does CPS Look for in a Home Visit?

When a CPS worker visits a home, they’ll look for signs that indicate how safe a home is or not. For example, is it exceedingly dirty to the point it poses a health hazard? Is there adequate food? Are there open signs of illegal activity like drug paraphernalia? Are dangerous objects or weapons easily accessible to children? Do the children have appropriate necessities? They won’t expect a spotless, perfect home, just one that meets reasonable safety standards. They’ll also be gauging your and your family’s behavior and will likely want to interview some or all of you to get a better sense of your routine and the kind of home life you have.

When Can CPS Take Your Child?

CPS can usually only remove a child from their home if there’s a valid, reasonable concern for the child’s safety. An order for removal is typically granted by a judge, either after an investigation or before an investigation if they consider your situation such a severe emergency that it requires instant separation. Emergency removal cases are rare, however, so unless there is an immediate threat, an investigation will need to take place first. Cases of neglect and abuse are the most likely causes for CPS to take your children.

What Happens if You Ignore CPS?

If a CPS caseworker contacts you as part of an investigation against you, you have some options for how to respond. Unless the caseworker has a warrant signed by a judge, you don’t have to let them into your home. You can also refuse to answer questions, and if your kids are home with you, you could prevent the caseworker from interviewing them at that time. However, your case will remain open and the investigation will continue. They may be able to come back with a search warrant to enter your home, get a court order to interview your children, or may even be allowed to interview your kids while they’re at school, even without your permission.

What if I Have a Complaint About CPS?

CPS exists to take care of children and families, but the process doesn’t always go perfectly each time. If you have a complaint about a CPS employee, you can try to talk to them directly and then escalate your concern to their manager if the employee is not willing to work things out with you. There are several levels of supervision within the CPS system, and you can escalate complaints all the way up to the state director. Some jurisdictions will even have a dedicated ombudsman who will investigate administrative complaints. If your concern applies more to systematic or policy issues within CPS, you may have related community organizations in your area you can contact, or you can reach out to your state representatives.

What is a Dependency Case?

Minor children are considered legally dependent on adult caretakers. When a child is left without a guardian who can take care of them, Child Protective Services may intervene and petition the courts to step in to support the child as a dependency case. Children may end up as dependents of the court if there’s evidence that they’re being abused by their parent or guardian, if their caretaker is neglecting or has abandoned them, or if the guardian becomes incarcerated, is struggling with substance abuse, or is otherwise unable to take care of the child. In most cases, the courts will try to assign programs to help the parents or guardians gain resources and education to better care for their children for family reunification. When that’s not possible, the children will usually wind up living with another relative or in foster care.

Best Time to Seek Legal Help

No matter what your legal issue may be, it is always best to seek legal help early in the process. An attorney can help secure what is likely to be the best possible outcome for your situation and avoid both unnecessary complications or errors.

Tips on Approaching an Initial Attorney Consultation

  • Use the consultation as a means of gaining a better understanding of your legal situation.
  • Ask the attorney how many cases similar to yours he/she has handled. An attorney’s experience and knowledge can speak to their expertise (or lack of) in addressing your situation.
  • Your attorney should be able to articulate roughly how long a case like yours will take to resolve and what sort of procedures to expect.
  • Determine how comfortable you are working with the lawyer and/or law firm.

Tips on Hiring an Experienced Lawyer with CPS Cases

The more experienced a lawyer is in legal practice, the more likely he/she will be able to bring about a successful resolution to your issue. Since experience matters, lawyers who’ve been practicing law for many years (with a successful track record) tend to be in high demand. You should look for information about a lawyer’s experience and ask questions during the initial meeting. It’s a very good idea to ask the lawyer how many years he/she has been practicing law and the expected outcome of your case.

Common legal terms explained

Affidavit – A sworn written statement made under oath. An affidavit is meant to be a supporting document to the court assisting in the verification of certain facts. An affidavit may or may not require notarization.

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